News / USA

Police Capture Boston Bombing Suspect

Police officers aim their weapons in Watertown, Massachusetts, April 19, 2013.
Police officers aim their weapons in Watertown, Massachusetts, April 19, 2013.
VOA News
Police have captured alive the second suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings after an intense day-long search of the Boston area.

Police cornered 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev hiding inside a boat in the backyard of a house in the Boston suburb of Watertown. Reports say he has been wounded and is in serious condition.

Onlookers cheered police and the FBI as they drove out of Watertown.

Massachusetts state police chief Tom Alben said he is eternally grateful for what happened Friday night, describing the police as exhausted but victorious. Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick said he is grateful to all law enforcement for what he called their extraordinary collaboration and cooperation.

Watch report from VOA's Carolyn Presutti in Watertown, Massachusetts

Relief Greets Arrest of Boston Bombing Suspecti
X
April 20, 2013 4:24 AM
VOA's Carolyn Presutti is reporting from the Boston area, on the capture of the one remaining suspect in Monday's deadly bombings at the city's marathon. Cheers, tears and high fives as police vehicles drive through the streets of Watertown, Massachusetts. The second suspect in the marathon bombing is captured, alive. People are bringing out their children, dressed in robes and pajamas, to witness these events. So for now Boston can return to normal, a bit more vigilant, but totally relieved.

They also thanked the public for their patience and thousands of tips phoned into the FBI and police, including the call that led police to the suspect hiding in the boat.

President Barack Obama, addressing reporters Friday night at the White House, said the nation is in debt to people of Boston and Massachusetts and to those he called the outstanding law enforcement professionals. He said the two bombers have failed because Americans refuse to be terrorized.

The FBI has identified Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and his older brother Tamerlan as the suspects in Monday's twin bombings at the Boston Marathon. The blasts killed three people and injured 176. They were identified just hours after the FBI released pictures of the two hoping the public would recognize them.

The FBI says it has video of Dzhokhar placing a backpack along a curb moments before the bombing.

Tamerlan was killed in a shootout with police in Watertown Thursday after he and his brother allegedly killed a security officer from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Police say they also stole a car and threw grenades and other explosives at officers during a police chase.

Police also say three people are have been taken into custody in the town of New Bedford, Massachusetts, where Dzhokhar once lived.

The brothers are ethnic Chechens and came to the Boston area as children. Family members and friends say they cannot believe the two could have carried out such a dreadful crime.

An uncle who lives in suburban Washington called them losers, though, who brought shame on all Chechens.

  • A police cruiser drives by as people react to news of the arrest of one of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, April 19, 2013, in Boston.
  • An ambulance carrying Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, a19-year-old Massachusetts college student wanted in the Boston Marathon bombings, turns into Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center after he was captured in an all day manhunt, April 19, 2013.
  • This still frame from video shows Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev visible through an ambulance after he was captured in Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • An FBI officer stands in front of the boat at 67 Franklin St., where Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings, was hiding inside in Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • Law enforcement officials are seen in front of 67 Franklin St after the capture of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings, in Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • A family reacts after police SWAT teams assaulted a house on their street, firing their weapons on Franklin Street during the search for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings, in Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • Police officers aim their weapons in Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • Officers look on as the search for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings continues, April 19, 2013, in Watertown.
  • Heavily armed police continue to patrol the neighborhoods of Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • Police patrol through a neighborhood in Watertown, while searching for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings, April 19, 2013.
  • A man looks out of his door as a SWAT team member knocks on his neighbors door as they search for the remaining suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings in Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • A barefooted woman runs for cover as police surround a home while searching for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings in Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • Law enforcement officers in tactical gear enter the search area for Dzhokar Tsarnaev, the one remaining suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing, in Watertown, Massachusetts, April 19, 2013.
  • A suspect wanted for questioning in relation to the April 15 Boston Marathon bombing is seen in handout photo released through the Boston Police Department Twitter page, April 19, 2013.
  • Police walk down School and Walnut Street on April 19, 2013 in Watertown.
  • A woman looks out a window at her home as police start to search an apartment building while looking for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings in Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • Images released by Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) shows "Suspect 2" (L-white cap) and "Suspect 1" (R-black cap) in the crowd before the blast at the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013.
  • Police on School and Walnut Street as the search continues for a suspect on April 19, 2013 in Watertown.
  • Residents view police in tactical gear conduct a search for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings, April 19, 2013, in Watertown.
  • Ruslan Tsarni, the uncle of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, walks into his home in Montgomery Village in Maryland, April, 19, 2013.
  • A Montgomery County, Maryland police officer pushes the media back from in front of the house of the uncle of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, April 19, 2013, in Montgomery Village.
  • Police officers keep a man on the ground in Watertown, April 19, 2013, following the shooting of a police officer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).
  • Police with guns drawn search for a suspect on April 19, 2013 in Watertown, Massachusetts.
  • Police officers keep a man on the ground in Watertown, April 19, 2013 following the shooting of a police officer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

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by: Derrick from: Atlanta
April 20, 2013 2:01 PM
I’m glad they caught the TRAITOR. This great country gives him asylum from his
former country and this is how he repays America? The entire of city of Boston shut down and sporting events cancelled and postponed. Bomber suspect also revealed his true feelings of America on his twitter a year ago. This controversial tweet has not been published on any media outlet. You can read more at: http://www.basketballworld24.com/2013/04/boston-bomber-reeks-havoc-in-boston.html

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
April 20, 2013 6:45 AM
Kudos to the FBI. This is how police should be. And the woman who phoned in to inform police of the wounded idiot in a boat should receive an award of honours for the good job of patriotism. Now I have 3 comments here. 1, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's father should be brought to the US for interrogation. He sounds like he knows what his children were doing. We hear they were refugees and their parents are alive in Chechnya - confusing? The father refused to speak in English - this is a clear sign of hatred for the West capable of breeding terrorism. That outright denial that his children were involved after unmistakable video footage is another pointer that the man is up to something against the US. 2, Terrorism is growing in the US and elsewhere because of the respect given to islam - the religion breeding them all. It says that in the US alone, over 400 people embrace islam daily. If the religion had been disfavored by the outcome of violence, the imams and curators of the religion would have devised other means of spreading the religion, but since it earns enough dividend through violence, why would they abandon violence. The idea is, apply more force to force them to accept islam. The solution would be to shun the religion that has brought nothing but grief to humanity on daily basis. It seems that islam is never at ease with people's happiness. 3, The boko haram terrorists in Nigeria come from families and live amongst people in the areas they operate. Because of collective resolve of the people and their leaders no one dares expose them. But when once a leader was shot at in Kano, it did not take long before the culprits were captured. The Nigeria security outfit should take a cue from the US approach to draft more forces into areas where boko haram menace looms. Note that Ahmadinejad was in Niger Republic last week - just behind Nigeria - to fortify and appraise the success of terrorists in the region. It is believed that terrorists in Nigeria are trained in neighbouring countries, one of which Ahmadinejad just visited. If Nigeria had the kind of intelligence that USA operates, Ahmadinejad's visit would have been a time to find out who are really the sponsors of boko haram terrorists in Nigeria and the African region. For the Niger visit was not for the people of Niger but to meet his terrorists before he exits presidency in Iran. The nabbing of African terrorist network can go a long way in curbing terrorism in the world.

by: Anonymous from: Southeastasia
April 20, 2013 2:57 AM
The phrase “war on terror” has been morphed into “overseas contingency operations" by the present US government. So, what term are they using now to describe their handling of the Boston bomb explosions and their perperators? "Domestic contingency operations". Obama, in contradiction to his own language policy toward terrorism, himself has repeatedly been using the term "terrorists" to refer to the Boston bomb explosion perpetrators. Mr Bush may have done a better job in dealing with terrorism than the present leader.

by: Observer from: Southeastasia
April 20, 2013 2:37 AM
It's scary. It's proven beyond any doubt already that America has become far less safe. Imagine that common people not only can buy powerful guns but also assemble bombs in their houses and explode them in crowds. There may be a fatal flaw in the immigration law which ephamsizes so much on the financial strength of potential immigrants. There are lots of people out there who or whose sponsors can pay the big money, enter a country and kill its people. There may be lots and lots of such people in the US now. Scary indeed.

by: Sergey from: Russia
April 20, 2013 2:01 AM
These are those whom you called freedom fighters in Russia and sent donations!!! Now fight for freedom they came to you, and these "heroes" you can see!!!

by: Dr. Queen from: USA
April 19, 2013 11:56 PM
there is no such thing as a "moderate" Muslim... to the extent that a Muslim is "moderate" he is betraying the Principles of Islam. They are here to ensure our destruction. and they do not have to be hauling drooling idiots like the Iranian... they are just ordinary Muslims you see all over here... these are the malignancy - ordinary Muslims are the disease among us.
In Response

by: An from: onymous
April 20, 2013 2:57 AM
If they are a disease, so are Christians and Catholics. The premise of their beliefs are the same.
It's mentally unstable people not receiving care that are the problem. Religion is just a catalyst.
In Response

by: Jamest from: Broadwater, Nebraska
April 20, 2013 1:12 AM
And all Scots are evil because Timothy McVeigh is of Scottish descent. And all Christians are evil because a handful take to bombing abortion clinics and assassinating doctors. Do you see how irrational this is?
The American physicist Steven Weinberg noted: “Religion is an insult to human dignity. With or without it, you'd have good people doing good things and evil people doing bad things, but for good people to do bad things, it takes religion.” So perhaps religion is the malignancy amongst us.
But we do not know the motivations of the terrorists. We do not know if it is ideology, politics, or something else. If you are a religious person, you might pray the terrorist survives his wounds, so we can interrogate him and find out.

by: James from: Braodwater, Nebraska
April 19, 2013 10:37 PM
Before we go jumping to conclusions about "Islamic terror" or any other conclusion, why don't we let the police investigators do their jobs. The men arrived here as children; that makes this domestic terror. Since one has been captured alive, how about if we find out how children could be turned into terrorists in Massachusetts ?

by: kristina from: austin tx
April 19, 2013 9:19 PM
Thankful for capturing another evil terrorist!

by: JasonP from: europe
April 19, 2013 8:35 PM
stupid people taking for granted the opportunities they had. positive actions and helping others is the ONLY way to make real change. killing others is only killing your cause. if you dont like america, dont live there.

by: JKF from: Ottawa, Canada
April 19, 2013 7:04 PM
Terrible sad incident, many unfortunate innocent civilians and valiant security members have lost their lives or have been injured by these savage terrorists. It is unfortunate, that both were not put out of business yesterday. ****I am speculating++++, that the remaining terrorist has: taken a household hostage, or has someone he knows hiding him or, has stolen/hijacked a driver/car and escaped the area or may have a hidding place/location. Any way, in my opinion, authorities should get citizens to phone check on their relatives, especially those that live alone; have people check all their vehicles, even those in storage, to see if any are missing, and check on any friend relative that may be missing/or was driving out of town and they have not heard from.
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