News / USA

Police Capture Boston Bombing Suspect

Police officers aim their weapons in Watertown, Massachusetts, April 19, 2013.
Police officers aim their weapons in Watertown, Massachusetts, April 19, 2013.
VOA News
Police have captured alive the second suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings after an intense day-long search of the Boston area.

Police cornered 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev hiding inside a boat in the backyard of a house in the Boston suburb of Watertown. Reports say he has been wounded and is in serious condition.

Onlookers cheered police and the FBI as they drove out of Watertown.

Massachusetts state police chief Tom Alben said he is eternally grateful for what happened Friday night, describing the police as exhausted but victorious. Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick said he is grateful to all law enforcement for what he called their extraordinary collaboration and cooperation.

Watch report from VOA's Carolyn Presutti in Watertown, Massachusetts

Relief Greets Arrest of Boston Bombing Suspecti
X
April 20, 2013 4:24 AM
VOA's Carolyn Presutti is reporting from the Boston area, on the capture of the one remaining suspect in Monday's deadly bombings at the city's marathon. Cheers, tears and high fives as police vehicles drive through the streets of Watertown, Massachusetts. The second suspect in the marathon bombing is captured, alive. People are bringing out their children, dressed in robes and pajamas, to witness these events. So for now Boston can return to normal, a bit more vigilant, but totally relieved.

They also thanked the public for their patience and thousands of tips phoned into the FBI and police, including the call that led police to the suspect hiding in the boat.

President Barack Obama, addressing reporters Friday night at the White House, said the nation is in debt to people of Boston and Massachusetts and to those he called the outstanding law enforcement professionals. He said the two bombers have failed because Americans refuse to be terrorized.

The FBI has identified Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and his older brother Tamerlan as the suspects in Monday's twin bombings at the Boston Marathon. The blasts killed three people and injured 176. They were identified just hours after the FBI released pictures of the two hoping the public would recognize them.

The FBI says it has video of Dzhokhar placing a backpack along a curb moments before the bombing.

Tamerlan was killed in a shootout with police in Watertown Thursday after he and his brother allegedly killed a security officer from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Police say they also stole a car and threw grenades and other explosives at officers during a police chase.

Police also say three people are have been taken into custody in the town of New Bedford, Massachusetts, where Dzhokhar once lived.

The brothers are ethnic Chechens and came to the Boston area as children. Family members and friends say they cannot believe the two could have carried out such a dreadful crime.

An uncle who lives in suburban Washington called them losers, though, who brought shame on all Chechens.

  • A police cruiser drives by as people react to news of the arrest of one of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, April 19, 2013, in Boston.
  • An ambulance carrying Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, a19-year-old Massachusetts college student wanted in the Boston Marathon bombings, turns into Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center after he was captured in an all day manhunt, April 19, 2013.
  • This still frame from video shows Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev visible through an ambulance after he was captured in Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • An FBI officer stands in front of the boat at 67 Franklin St., where Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings, was hiding inside in Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • Law enforcement officials are seen in front of 67 Franklin St after the capture of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings, in Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • A family reacts after police SWAT teams assaulted a house on their street, firing their weapons on Franklin Street during the search for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings, in Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • Police officers aim their weapons in Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • Officers look on as the search for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings continues, April 19, 2013, in Watertown.
  • Heavily armed police continue to patrol the neighborhoods of Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • Police patrol through a neighborhood in Watertown, while searching for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings, April 19, 2013.
  • A man looks out of his door as a SWAT team member knocks on his neighbors door as they search for the remaining suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings in Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • A barefooted woman runs for cover as police surround a home while searching for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings in Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • Law enforcement officers in tactical gear enter the search area for Dzhokar Tsarnaev, the one remaining suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing, in Watertown, Massachusetts, April 19, 2013.
  • A suspect wanted for questioning in relation to the April 15 Boston Marathon bombing is seen in handout photo released through the Boston Police Department Twitter page, April 19, 2013.
  • Police walk down School and Walnut Street on April 19, 2013 in Watertown.
  • A woman looks out a window at her home as police start to search an apartment building while looking for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings in Watertown, April 19, 2013.
  • Images released by Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) shows "Suspect 2" (L-white cap) and "Suspect 1" (R-black cap) in the crowd before the blast at the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013.
  • Police on School and Walnut Street as the search continues for a suspect on April 19, 2013 in Watertown.
  • Residents view police in tactical gear conduct a search for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings, April 19, 2013, in Watertown.
  • Ruslan Tsarni, the uncle of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, walks into his home in Montgomery Village in Maryland, April, 19, 2013.
  • A Montgomery County, Maryland police officer pushes the media back from in front of the house of the uncle of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, April 19, 2013, in Montgomery Village.
  • Police officers keep a man on the ground in Watertown, April 19, 2013, following the shooting of a police officer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).
  • Police with guns drawn search for a suspect on April 19, 2013 in Watertown, Massachusetts.
  • Police officers keep a man on the ground in Watertown, April 19, 2013 following the shooting of a police officer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

You May Like

China’s Influence Grows With New Infrastructure Bank

Multibillion-dollar China-backed and BRICS-supported Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank seen as possible challenger to such lenders as IMF, World Bank More

Video Rabbi Hits Road to Heal Jewish-Muslim Relations in France

Rabbi Michel Serfaty makes the rounds in his friendship bus to encourage dialogue and break down barriers between the two groups More

Post-deal Iran Leaders Need 'Economic Momentum' to Solidify Power Base

Economists say deal could inject more than $100 billion into coffers - not enough to entirely rescue ailing economy - but maybe adequate to create 'economic momentum' More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments page of 2
    Next 
by: Derrick from: Atlanta
April 20, 2013 2:01 PM
I’m glad they caught the TRAITOR. This great country gives him asylum from his
former country and this is how he repays America? The entire of city of Boston shut down and sporting events cancelled and postponed. Bomber suspect also revealed his true feelings of America on his twitter a year ago. This controversial tweet has not been published on any media outlet. You can read more at: http://www.basketballworld24.com/2013/04/boston-bomber-reeks-havoc-in-boston.html

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
April 20, 2013 6:45 AM
Kudos to the FBI. This is how police should be. And the woman who phoned in to inform police of the wounded idiot in a boat should receive an award of honours for the good job of patriotism. Now I have 3 comments here. 1, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's father should be brought to the US for interrogation. He sounds like he knows what his children were doing. We hear they were refugees and their parents are alive in Chechnya - confusing? The father refused to speak in English - this is a clear sign of hatred for the West capable of breeding terrorism. That outright denial that his children were involved after unmistakable video footage is another pointer that the man is up to something against the US. 2, Terrorism is growing in the US and elsewhere because of the respect given to islam - the religion breeding them all. It says that in the US alone, over 400 people embrace islam daily. If the religion had been disfavored by the outcome of violence, the imams and curators of the religion would have devised other means of spreading the religion, but since it earns enough dividend through violence, why would they abandon violence. The idea is, apply more force to force them to accept islam. The solution would be to shun the religion that has brought nothing but grief to humanity on daily basis. It seems that islam is never at ease with people's happiness. 3, The boko haram terrorists in Nigeria come from families and live amongst people in the areas they operate. Because of collective resolve of the people and their leaders no one dares expose them. But when once a leader was shot at in Kano, it did not take long before the culprits were captured. The Nigeria security outfit should take a cue from the US approach to draft more forces into areas where boko haram menace looms. Note that Ahmadinejad was in Niger Republic last week - just behind Nigeria - to fortify and appraise the success of terrorists in the region. It is believed that terrorists in Nigeria are trained in neighbouring countries, one of which Ahmadinejad just visited. If Nigeria had the kind of intelligence that USA operates, Ahmadinejad's visit would have been a time to find out who are really the sponsors of boko haram terrorists in Nigeria and the African region. For the Niger visit was not for the people of Niger but to meet his terrorists before he exits presidency in Iran. The nabbing of African terrorist network can go a long way in curbing terrorism in the world.

by: Anonymous from: Southeastasia
April 20, 2013 2:57 AM
The phrase “war on terror” has been morphed into “overseas contingency operations" by the present US government. So, what term are they using now to describe their handling of the Boston bomb explosions and their perperators? "Domestic contingency operations". Obama, in contradiction to his own language policy toward terrorism, himself has repeatedly been using the term "terrorists" to refer to the Boston bomb explosion perpetrators. Mr Bush may have done a better job in dealing with terrorism than the present leader.

by: Observer from: Southeastasia
April 20, 2013 2:37 AM
It's scary. It's proven beyond any doubt already that America has become far less safe. Imagine that common people not only can buy powerful guns but also assemble bombs in their houses and explode them in crowds. There may be a fatal flaw in the immigration law which ephamsizes so much on the financial strength of potential immigrants. There are lots of people out there who or whose sponsors can pay the big money, enter a country and kill its people. There may be lots and lots of such people in the US now. Scary indeed.

by: Sergey from: Russia
April 20, 2013 2:01 AM
These are those whom you called freedom fighters in Russia and sent donations!!! Now fight for freedom they came to you, and these "heroes" you can see!!!

by: Dr. Queen from: USA
April 19, 2013 11:56 PM
there is no such thing as a "moderate" Muslim... to the extent that a Muslim is "moderate" he is betraying the Principles of Islam. They are here to ensure our destruction. and they do not have to be hauling drooling idiots like the Iranian... they are just ordinary Muslims you see all over here... these are the malignancy - ordinary Muslims are the disease among us.
In Response

by: An from: onymous
April 20, 2013 2:57 AM
If they are a disease, so are Christians and Catholics. The premise of their beliefs are the same.
It's mentally unstable people not receiving care that are the problem. Religion is just a catalyst.
In Response

by: Jamest from: Broadwater, Nebraska
April 20, 2013 1:12 AM
And all Scots are evil because Timothy McVeigh is of Scottish descent. And all Christians are evil because a handful take to bombing abortion clinics and assassinating doctors. Do you see how irrational this is?
The American physicist Steven Weinberg noted: “Religion is an insult to human dignity. With or without it, you'd have good people doing good things and evil people doing bad things, but for good people to do bad things, it takes religion.” So perhaps religion is the malignancy amongst us.
But we do not know the motivations of the terrorists. We do not know if it is ideology, politics, or something else. If you are a religious person, you might pray the terrorist survives his wounds, so we can interrogate him and find out.

by: James from: Braodwater, Nebraska
April 19, 2013 10:37 PM
Before we go jumping to conclusions about "Islamic terror" or any other conclusion, why don't we let the police investigators do their jobs. The men arrived here as children; that makes this domestic terror. Since one has been captured alive, how about if we find out how children could be turned into terrorists in Massachusetts ?

by: kristina from: austin tx
April 19, 2013 9:19 PM
Thankful for capturing another evil terrorist!

by: JasonP from: europe
April 19, 2013 8:35 PM
stupid people taking for granted the opportunities they had. positive actions and helping others is the ONLY way to make real change. killing others is only killing your cause. if you dont like america, dont live there.

by: JKF from: Ottawa, Canada
April 19, 2013 7:04 PM
Terrible sad incident, many unfortunate innocent civilians and valiant security members have lost their lives or have been injured by these savage terrorists. It is unfortunate, that both were not put out of business yesterday. ****I am speculating++++, that the remaining terrorist has: taken a household hostage, or has someone he knows hiding him or, has stolen/hijacked a driver/car and escaped the area or may have a hidding place/location. Any way, in my opinion, authorities should get citizens to phone check on their relatives, especially those that live alone; have people check all their vehicles, even those in storage, to see if any are missing, and check on any friend relative that may be missing/or was driving out of town and they have not heard from.
Comments page of 2
    Next 

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
US Gay Marriage Ruling Yields Real-life Impacti
X
Michael Bowman
June 28, 2015 10:05 PM
Friday’s landmark Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage throughout the United States is an outcome few thought possible just years ago, and shows a nation that increasingly tolerates and even celebrates the hopes and aspirations of gay people. VOA’s Michael Bowman spoke to a same-sex couple that will benefit from the high court ruling, and to a Christian scholar who is apprehensive about its potential consequences for America’s faith community.
Video

Video US Gay Marriage Ruling Yields Real-life Impact

Friday’s landmark Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage throughout the United States is an outcome few thought possible just years ago, and shows a nation that increasingly tolerates and even celebrates the hopes and aspirations of gay people. VOA’s Michael Bowman spoke to a same-sex couple that will benefit from the high court ruling, and to a Christian scholar who is apprehensive about its potential consequences for America’s faith community.
Video

Video Syrians Flee IS Advance in Hasaka

The Syrian government said Monday it has taken back one of several districts in Hasaka overrun by Islamic State militants. But continued fighting elsewhere in the northern city has forced thousands of civilians from their homes. In this report narrated by Bill Rodgers, VOA Kurdish Service reporter Zana Omer describes the scene in Amouda, where some of the displaced are taking refuge.
Video

Video Rabbi Hits Road to Heal Jewish-Muslim Relations in France

France is on high alert after last week's terrorist attack near the city Lyon, just six months after deadly Paris shootings. The attack have added new tensions to relations between French Jews and Muslims. France’s Jewish and Muslim communities also share a common heritage, though, and as far as one French rabbi is concerned, they are destined to be friends. From the Paris suburb of La Courneuve, Lisa Bryant reports about Rabbi Michel Serfaty and his friendship bus.
Video

Video S. Korea Christians Protest Gay Rights Festival

The U.S. Supreme Court decision mandating marriage equality nationwide has energized gay rights supporters around the world. Gay rights remain a highly contentious issue in a key U.S. ally, South Korea, where police did a deft job Sunday of preventing potential clashes between Christian protesters and gay activists. Kurt Achin reports from Seoul.
Video

Video Saudi Leaks Expose ‘Checkbook Diplomacy’ In Battle With Iran

Saudi Arabia’s willingness to wield its oil money on the global diplomatic stage appears to have been laid bare, after the website WikiLeaks published tens of thousands of leaked cables from Riyadh’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs. VOA's Henry Ridgwell reports.
Video

Video Nubians in Kenya Face Land Challenges

East Africa's ethnic Nubians have a rich cultural history that dates back thousands of years, but in Kenya they are facing hardships, including the loss of lands they have lived on for generations. They say the government has reneged on its pledge to award them title deeds for the plots. VOA's Lenny Ruvaga reports.
Video

Video Syrian Refugees Return to Tal Abyad

Syrian refugees in Turkey confirm they left their hometown of Tal Abyad because of intense fighting and coalition airstrikes, not because Kurdish fighters were engaged in ethnic cleansing, as some Turkish officials charged. VOA Kurdish Service reporter Zana Omer, in Tal Abyad, finds that civilians coming back to the town agree, as we hear in this report narrated by Roger Wilkison.
Video

Video Military Experts Question New Russian Tank Capabilities

Russia has been showing off its new tank design – the Armata T-14. Designers claim it is 20 years ahead of current Western designs - and driving it feels like playing a computer game. But military analysts question those assertions, and warn the cost could be too heavy a burden for Russia’s struggling economy. Henry Ridgwell reports.
Video

Video In Kenya, Police Said to Shoot First, Ask Questions Later

An organization that documents torture and extrajudicial killings says Kenyan police were responsible for 1,252 shooting deaths in five cities, including Nairobi, between 2009 and 2014, representing 67 percent of all gun deaths in the areas reviewed. Gabe Joselow has more from Nairobi.
Video

Video In Syrian Crisis, Social Media Offer Small Comforts

Za’atari, a makeshift city in Jordan, may be the only Syrian refugee camp to tweet its activities, in an effort to keep donors motivated as the war in Syria intensifies and the humanitarian crisis deepens. Inside the camp, families say mobile phone applications help hold together families that are physically torn apart. VOA’s Heather Murdock reports.
Video

Video Chemical-Sniffing Technology Fights Australia's Graffiti Vandals

Cities and towns all over the world spend huge amounts of resources battling graffiti writers who deface buildings, public transport vehicles and even monuments. Authorities in Sydney, Australia, hope a new chemical-sniffing technology finally will stop vandals from scribbling on walls in the passenger areas of commuter trains. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Cambodia Struggling to Curb Child Labor

Earlier this year a United Nations report found 10 percent of Cambodian children aged 7-14 are working – one of the highest rates in the region – and said one in four children in that age bracket are forced to quit school to help their families. Although the child labor rate has dropped over the past decade, Cambodia has a lot more to do – including keeping more children in school. Robert Carmichael reports for VOA from Phnom Penh.

VOA Blogs