News / Middle East

Amid Objections, Egypt's Interim Leaders Work on Cabinet

Egypt's interim Prime Minister, Hazem el-Beblawi (File Photo)
Egypt's interim Prime Minister, Hazem el-Beblawi (File Photo)
Purnell Murdock
Egypt's interim Prime Minister, Hazem el-Beblawi, is weighing potential Cabinet picks Thursday, with ousted President Mohamed Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood rejecting any role and criticizing arrest warrants issued Wednesday for its leaders. 
 
The country's top prosecutor ordered the arrest of Muslim Brotherhood chief Mohammed Badie, one of his deputies, and eight others, accusing them of inciting violence that killed 51 people Monday in Cairo.
 
Ahmed Aref, a spokesman for the Muslim Brotherhood, criticized the warrants, calling them "the same old police state tactics."  He said the focus should be on the military's actions.
 
Aref said the issue is not about these icons of the Muslim Brotherhood who were ordered arrested. He said those who died in cold blood are much more important than the icons.

Supporters of ousted Egypt's President Mohammed Morsi shout slogans during a demonstration after the Iftar prayer, evening meal when Muslims break their fast during the Islamic month of Ramadan, in Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt, July 10, 2013.
Supporters of ousted Egypt's President Mohammed Morsi shout slogans during a demonstration after the Iftar prayer, evening meal when Muslims break their fast during the Islamic month of Ramadan, in Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt, July 10, 2013.
 
More protests planned

Wednesday night, supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi carried empty coffins towards the presidential palace in Cairo.  They said the coffins represent the people killed since the military took over the government after ousting Morsi. 
 
The Muslim Brotherhood has called for mass demonstrations on Friday.
 
The Brotherhood is demanding Morsi be reinstated.  The movement, along with the ultra-conservative Islamist Nour Party, and other smaller parties, are critical of the transition plan laid out by the military and interim President Adly Mansour. The plan includes amending the constitution and holding new parliamentary and presidential elections.
 
Meanwhile, the United States says it is going ahead with a planned delivery of four F-16 fighter jets, which are due to arrive in Egypt in the coming weeks.  The jets are part of a set of 20 Egypt is due to receive this year.
 
The U.S. government is evaluating the implications of Morsi's ouster last week.  If it determines the Egyptian military carried out a coup, U.S. law requires the government to cut off more than $1 billion in aid.
 
White House spokesman Jay Carney said Wednesday it is a complicated issue, and that it is not in the best interest of the U.S. to alter the aid program "quickly or immediately."  

  • Supporters of Egypt's deposed President Mohamed Morsi carry the body of a fellow supporter killed outside the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo, July 8, 2013.
  • A wounded supporter of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi lies at a private hospital in Cairo, July 8, 2013.
  • Supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi attend a protest outside a military building where he is belived to be detained in Cairo, July 7, 2013.
  • Supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi march to the Republican Guards headquarters where they believe he is being held by the army, Cairo, July 7, 2013.
  • Muslim Brotherhood leader Asem Abd-ElMaged delivers a speech to supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, Cairo, July 7, 2013.
  • Opponents of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, July 7, 2013.
  • Thousands poured into Tahrir Square to celebrate what they are calling Egypt's "Second Revolution", the military's ouster of president Mohamed Morsi, July 7, 2013. (S. Behn/VOA)
  • A man in Tahrir Square holds a sticker saying "No To Terrorism" in reference to the Muslim Brotherhood, July 7, 2013. (S. Behn/VOA)
  • A man in Tahrir Square writes on a poster "History Will Never Forget Obama," July 7, 2013 (S. Behn/VOA)
  • Many of those who rallied in Tahrir Square brought their families and children, July 7, 2013. (S. Behn/VOA)
  • Protests against ousted president Mohamed Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood supporters have generated high sales for all sorts of nationalist souvenirs, from flags to T-shirts, July 7, 2013. (S. Behn/VOA)
  • Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi clash with anti-Morsi protesters in Alexandria, July 7, 2013.
 

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Comments
     
by: Derek from: NY
July 11, 2013 10:04 AM
I'm neither Egyptian nor Muslim and I don't agree w/ the political beliefs of the Muslim Brotherhood. But how is the military ouster of Morsi, a democratically-elected leader, not a coup? I realize Morsi was unpopular and his govt had many problems but the way to deal with that was vote him out in the next election. By using force to ouster Morsi I'm worried that it may lead to civil war in Egypt. I'm also worried about mob rule. If the next elected Egyptian leader is unpopular will people again demand the army remove him?


by: Godwin from: Nigeria
July 11, 2013 8:27 AM
Arrest those who love to kill but hate to be killed. They claim to be religious, but they have no respect for God. Look at them calling for disturbance on a day they should be worshiping their God. But they have no respect for God or man, and they want to rule the people. Their last hope should have been the judiciary, but they have no regard for that too. So where are they going to get their justice? Mob action and terrorism have been their hallmark.

They repeated it on Monday and killed 51. They should not be allowed to get away with it under any guise. The Muslim Brotherhood and its standards are the problems that necessitated the first and the current revolution. The interim administration should not be fagged by their obstinacy and intransigence. With or without the Muslim Brotherhood, let the transition government fashion a democracy that is workable and acceptable everywhere in the world. Let Egypt return to the part of freedom and rights of peoples and individuals. Let the people be free. Like of the old pharaos, the Muslim Brotherhood should let the people of Egypt go.

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