News / Asia

11 Days After Super Typhoon, Remote Areas Still Lack Food

  • Typhoon survivors board a Philippine Air Force transport plane in Tacloban, Nov. 21, 2013.
  • A Philippine man carries aid from a U.S. Navy Seahawk helicopter in Palo, Philippines, Nov. 20, 2013.
  • U.S. sailors and Marines load supplies onto a helicopter to be delivered in Eastern Sumar Province, Philippines, Nov. 20, 2013. (U.S. Navy)
  • U.S. military personnel carry supplies to be distributed in Eastern Sumar Province, Philippines, Nov. 20, 2013. (U.S. Navy)
  • U.S. sailors work with Philippine armed forces members to transport relief supplies in Ormoc City, Philippines, Nov. 18, 2013. (U.S. Navy)
  • A member of the U.S. Navy hugs a child during a visit to Philippine Army base Camp Downes in support of Operation Damayan, Nov. 18, 2013. (U.S. Navy)
  • A Seahawk helicopter transports international relief supplies in support of Operation Damayan, Ormoc City, Philippines, Nov. 17, 2013. (U.S. Navy)
  • U.S. sailors and Marines work with Philippine civilians to unload relief supplies in Guiuan, Philippines, Nov. 17, 2013. (U.S. Navy)
  • Villagers scramble for aid from a U.S. Navy helicopter in the coastal town of Tanawan, Philippines, Nov. 17. 2013.
  • A soldier carries a baby to board a U.S. military transport plane at the damaged Tacloban airport, Tacloban city, Philippines, Nov. 17, 2013.
  • A U.S. hospital corpsman assists Philippine nurses in treating a patient's head wound at the Immaculate Conception School refugee camp, Guiuan, Philippines, Nov. 17, 2013. (U.S. Navy)
  • Philippine citizens board an U.S. HC-130 Hercules to be airlifted to safety in support of Operation Damayan, Guiuan, Nov. 17, 2013. (U.S. Navy)

Relief Operations in the Philippines

Simone Orendain
— In the Philippines, the World Food Program says a quarter of the people in dire need of food in the typhoon-battered central parts of the country still have not received it. Eleven days after the storm hit, the government says some 5,600 people are dead or missing (3,982 people killed, 1,602 missing).

Officials and international aid groups have struggled with the challenge of delivering food to remote and inaccessible parts of the country.

On Tuesday, WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin said agencies have so far distributed emergency packages to 1.9 million people who have had no access to food since Super Typhoon Haiyan struck on November 8. But that still leaves another 600,000 who have had nothing to eat for the last 11 days.

Cousin told reporters in Manila the archipelagic nature of the Philippines has made it difficult to reach everyone. She said aid workers are using helicopters, planes, boats and trucks to push the food packs out.

“This is a relief effort where there are so many remote communities, that the challenges of getting into every community have been massive,” Cousin said.

The aid effort has been challenged by the Philippines spread-out geography, as well as damaged roads and airstrips. Government groups and aid agencies had been contending with power outages, no communications and impassable roads for days.

These issues have been partially addressed in a majority of the affected provinces but some provinces still have no power and very poor cellular phone signals.

U.S. and Philippines forces have been delivering food by landing helicopters in inaccessible places and delivering food by hand.

WATCH: Related video from VOA's Steve Herman
Typhoon-Devastated Philippines Province Still Depending on Aid from Airi
X
November 20, 2013 5:50 AM
After a Philippines congressman and former governor flew over his typhoon-ravaged district, he lamented “there is no more Eastern Samar province.” That is where VOA correspondent Steve Herman and videographer Zinlat Aung spent part of the day November 20.

Cousin said some have suggested relying more on air drops. But that kind of delivery method would not be as effective, she said.

“We know that while just dropping food would really look good on camera, those who are most in need of food would not receive it. Those are children, those are women, those are seniors. Those are the disabled,” Cousin said.

Cousin reiterated that the World Food Program could not do its work alone. She said the agency is working with the government and other international humanitarian groups. According to Cousin, as more of these agencies arrive in the hard-hit areas, more people will be reached.

Meanwhile, U.S. aid efforts continue:

The latest photos from Eastern Samar:

  • A devastated village in Eastern Samar province makes a plea for help, Philippines, Nov. 19, 2013. (Steve Herman/VOA)
  • A plea for assistance to those flying overhead in Eastern Samar province, Philippines, Nov. 19, 2013. (Steve Herman/VOA)
  • An aerial view of a devastated village in Eastern Samar province, Philippines, Nov. 19, 2013. (Steve Herman/VOA)
  • Police come to meet an incoming US Navy helicopter landing at Hernani, Philippines, Nov. 19, 2013. (Steve Herman/VOA)
  • Residents of Lawaan rush to offload food being brought in by a U.S. Navy helicopter, Philippines, Nov. 19, 2013. (Steve Herman/VOA)
  • Some of the damage from Typhoon Haiyan in Lawaan, Eastern Samar Philippines, Nov. 19, 2013. (Steve Herman/VOA)
  • A damaged church in Eastern Samar, Philippines, Nov. 19, 2013. (Steve Herman/VOA)
  • Trucks carrying aid into Eastern Samar province, Philippines, Nov. 19, 2013. (Steve Herman/VOA)
  • An American NGO worker pleads with a U.S. Navy helicopter crewman to bring more aid as VOA videographer Zinlat Aung videotapes the encounter in Hernani, Philippines, Nov. 19, 2013. (Steve Herman/VOA)
  • A change of crew on the deck of the USS George Washington for the MH-60 Sea Hawk helicopter on which a VOA crew rode, Nov. 19, 2013. (Steve Herman/VOA)

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by: Keen from: Philippines
November 20, 2013 10:02 AM
My country is really grateful for the overwhelming and outpouring of financial and emotional support from foreign countries...I believe this is just a beginning of a long, arduous rehabilitation of the victims as well the rest of the country...I strongly believe that the Filipinos can recover from this beyond belief experience but we can't do this in our accord...

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