News / Middle East

Morsi Supporters Clash With Egyptian Security Forces

Related video of clashes in Egypti
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July 16, 2013 3:10 PM
Clashes between security forces and supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi have left at least seven people dead and more than 260 injured.

Related video of clashes in Egypt

Edward Yeranian
After several days of relative calm, violence overnight in Cairo between Egyptian police, backed by local residents, and supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi left at seven dead and about 260 people injured.  Security forces have arrested 400 people for questioning over the violence.

The bloodshed came after supporters of Egypt's ousted president tried to block traffic at several key intersections and along a main Cairo bridge.  Police and residents of nearby Giza stopped the protesters before they were able to cross that bridge.

Al-Ahram Online reported that some Morsi supporters were holed up at a mosque near Ramsis Square where violence first broke out. Witnesses say police fired tear gas to prevent the protesters from reaching nearby Tahrir Square where Morsi opponents were camped out.

On the political front, Egyptian media indicated that interim Prime Minister Hazem el-Beblawi might announce the formation of his new government late Tuesday. The names of some of his ministers, including Defense Minister Abdel Fattah el Sissi and Foreign Minister Hisham Fahmy, are already known.

Watch related video of VOA's Sharon Behn in Cairo

Video of VOA's Sharon Behn in Cairoi
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July 16, 2013 3:16 PM
After three days of relative calm, protests erupted across Egypt Monday night. In Cairo, clashes between supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi and the security forces at least seven people dead and many others injured. VOA's Sharon Behn in Cairo reports.

Presidential spokesman Ahmed Muslimany told journalists that members of both Mr. Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafi Nour Party have been offered posts in the new government.  Neither party, however, is expected to join.

Muslimany said Egypt's tumultuous political history of the past few years, including the divisive eras of two ousted presidents and a military government, have turned Egyptians against each other.

He said three different political periods of recent history have created rival ideologies and pitted everyone against everyone else.  He says Egypt's interim presidency is now proposing that everyone work with each other, respecting each other's points of view, and living together despite their differences.

The presidential spokesman went on to say that each rival political faction contains both moderates and extremists. But, he argued, political life in every country centers on these factions coming to a consensus, since cooperation is needed for society to function.

Visiting U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns echoed those ideas, urging Egypt's new interim leaders not to exclude anyone from a new government. Egyptians, he insisted, must “come together to find a nonviolent and inclusive path forward.”

  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi offer their Friday prayer where protesters have installed their camp and held their daily rally, at Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt, July 19, 2013. 
  • A supporter of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi offers his Friday prayer where protesters have installed their camp and held their daily rally, at Nasr city, Cairo, Egypt, July 19, 2013. 
  • A supporter of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi holds up a sign with an image of Morsi as they protest at the Rabaa el-Adawiya square where they are camping in Cairo, July 19, 2013. 
  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi hold up placards as they shout slogans during a demonstration where protesters have installed their camp, at Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt, July 19, 2013. 
  • Egyptian riot police stand guard during a demonstration by supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi, near Tahrir Square in Cairo, July 17, 2013.
  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi, demonstrate near Tahrir Square in Cairo, July 17, 2013.
  • Supporters of Mohamed Morsi make a fire to stop the effects of tear gas fired by riot police in central Cairo, July 15, 2013.
  • A supporter of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi wears an Islamic veil which reads "There is no god but God, Mohammed is the messenger of God," during a rally in front of Cairo University, July 16, 2013.
  • A firework fired by opponents of ousted President Mohamed Morsi explodes during clashes in downtown Cairo, July 15, 2013.
  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi block Giza square during a march near Cairo University, where protesters have been camped out, Cairo, July 15, 2013.
  • A member of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporter of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi cools people off during afternoon prayers at the Rabaa Adawiya square in Cairo, July 15, 2013.
  • A Morsi supporter arranges flags for sale in Nasr city, Cairo, July 15, 2013.
  • A supporter of ousted Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi attaches a poster at a blocked road linked to the Republican Guard building in Cairo, Egypt, July 15, 2013.
  • An Egyptian soldier keeps watch from atop a military vehicle in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, July 14, 2013.



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by: ali baba from: new york
July 16, 2013 5:17 AM
The Egyptian Gov. has use the methods of Mubarak and Nasser to stop these fanatic from stir problem and put the country in civil war. .keeping them in street will not benefit the country .They have to stay in mental institution and given them electric shock to eliminate the strange thought of democracy which it does not exist in Islam .they have to know that Egyptian tired and sick from them .Egypt people revolt and kick moersi out . They have to know the reality

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