News / Africa

Nigeria Girls Missing, 11 Weeks After Abduction

Nigeria School Girls Still Missing, 11 Weeks After Abductioni
X
Mariama Diallo
July 07, 2014 7:30 PM
It's been almost three months since more than 200 school girls were abducted by the Islamist militant group Boko Haram in northern Nigeria. The kidnapping made headlines worldwide, and several countries, including the United States, promised to help bring the girls back to their families. But as Mariama Diallo reports, the girls are still missing, and advocates for their return are growing frustrated.

Nigeria School Girls Still Missing, 11 Weeks After Abduction

Mariama Diallo

It's been almost three months since more than 200 school girls were abducted by the Islamist militant group Boko Haram in northern Nigeria. The kidnapping made headlines worldwide, and several countries, including the United States, promised to help bring the girls back to their families. The girls are still missing, however, and advocates for their return are growing frustrated.

Three weeks after the girls were kidnapped by Boko Haram, demonstrations demanding action took place in many cities, including Washington. The hashtag #bringbackourgirls trended on social media, along with a photo of the U.S. first lady holding up a sign to show her support.

But nearly 90 days after the abduction, there are those who feel the drive and the passion to find the girls seems to have diminished. Omolola Adele-Oso was the lead organizer of a rally in front of the Nigerian embassy in Washington. She spoke to VOA via Skype.

"I think the unfortunate part is we are in a world of life-cycle news where everything is two days and it's out of everybody's memory," said Adele-Oso ."Right after the rally, the issues of Iraq and the rescued soldier from Afghanistan, all these things have been happening, especially in American news."

Some say because of the new demands in Iraq, the U.S. has scaled back its intelligence and surveillance mission in Nigeria.

Coalition partnership

Pentagon Spokesman Rear Admiral John Kirby refuted that presumption, and he said that since the original surge of efforts, the U.S. has been joined by more coalition partners.

“Are we flying exactly as many flights as we were at the outset? No. But the same level of effort is being sustained now internationally by everybody,” said Kirby.

State Department spokesperson Marie Harf said the U.S. still maintains a significant level of cooperation.

“Obviously, the kidnapping, other attacks that have happened since then have prompted us to increase our assistance, to do more training, to do more to boost the capacity of the Nigerian military and of the Nigerian Government,” she said.

As days pass, Sylvester Okere, a Nigerian-American businessman and advocate, said time is running out.

"Some of these girls are already getting pregnant. These are someone's children. This could be my daughter. I have an 18-year-old and 12-year-old daughter, this could be my child, and this could be my sister," he said.

Violence continues

Since the school girls’ abduction, other attacks have taken place and more people have been kidnapped.

Adele-Oso said her group is planning another rally in Washington on July 14 and still holds the Nigerian government  accountable.

“Why is it that we cannot negotiate with Boko Haram? If it's money they want, give them money. Sixty more women were taken. Why is it so hard for the [Nigerian President Goodluck] Jonathan administration to do something?" she asked.

But as support dies down in some places, new people have joined the global campaign to free the Nigerian girls, like thousands of Filipino students who recently rallied in Manila.

 

 

 

You May Like

Multimedia Social Media Documenting, Not Driving, Hong Kong Protests

Unlike Arab Spring uprisings, pro-democracy protestors in Hong Kong aren't relying on Twitter and Facebook to organize, but social media still plays a role More

Analysis: Occupy Central Not Exactly Hong Kong’s Tiananmen

VOA's former Hong Kong, Beijing correspondent compares and contrasts 1989 Tiananmen Square protest with what is now happening in Hong Kong More

Bambari Hospital a Lone Place of Help in Violence-Plagued CAR

Only establishment still functioning in CAR's second city is main hospital More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Zira Tari from: abuja
July 04, 2014 12:59 AM
We Nigerians are in a situation where Govt that suppose to care for it own citizens end up only respecting the wishes of his party Men 'n Women, it has no respect for the life of it citizens, it only has respect Money 'n Power. Our chibokgirls 'n entire northeast people are hopeless 'n helpless 'n greedy leaders from are watching 'n making their money with the life of it own peoples Oh what Shameful Northern Leaders!

In Response

by: 1worldnow from: Earth
July 04, 2014 8:35 AM
We have nothing but sorrow and dread for what is happening to your little girls there,but that doesn't help your situation. My beloved nation, US, is being pushed back by Badluck Jonathan, as he is pushing back any of the most powerful nations in the world that can crush BOKO HARAM in just a few hours! The fear of harm that may come to the innocent may not be an issue for your people anymore since they have just kidnapped more and are getting stronger by the day! I'd say that ALL NIGERIANS band together and crush Boko Haram, toss Badluck out on his head! Your people will send a clear message to the whole world: mess with one Nigerian, you mess with ALL NIGERIANS! Boko Haram are not Nigerians, they are a disease, and the disease is spreading. Lagos is Boko Haram's destination, and somebody needs ot act now! Badluck Jonathan isn't!


by: Maribel Harmjanz from: Texas
July 03, 2014 10:46 PM
This is a tragedy, but we should never give up. Those precious girls, those precious women that are kidnapped, raped, tortured are our sisters, our mothers, our daughters, ourselves... We should keep on praying that they will be found, aa well as all the victims of human trafficking... Let's unite our prayers, let's support those who are struggling to find them...!

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
The Legacy of Jimmy Carter: The Preacher from Plainsi
X
October 01, 2014 10:45 AM
It is common in the United States to see tourists flock to sites associated with America's presidents. Some are privately owned and others are run by the National Park Service or the National Archives -- but most have helped draw business and people into the towns and cities where they are located. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, there is one particular presidential hometown that is unique in what it has to offer those who make the trip.
Video

Video The Legacy of Jimmy Carter: The Preacher from Plains

It is common in the United States to see tourists flock to sites associated with America's presidents. Some are privately owned and others are run by the National Park Service or the National Archives -- but most have helped draw business and people into the towns and cities where they are located. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, there is one particular presidential hometown that is unique in what it has to offer those who make the trip.
Video

Video Hong Kong Protests Draw New Supporters on National Holiday

On the 65th anniversary of the founding of Communist China, Hong Kong protesters are hoping to stage the largest pro-democracy demonstration since the 1989 Tiananmen protests. VOA's Brian Padden visited one of the protest sites mid-day, when the atmosphere was calm and where the supporters were enthusiastic about joining what they are calling the umbrella revolution.
Video

Video India's PM Continues First US Visit

India's prime minister is on his first visit to Washington, to strengthen political and economic ties between the world's oldest and the world biggest democracies. He came to the U.S. capital from New York, the first stop on his five-day visit to the country that denied him an entry visa in the past. From Washington, Zlatica Hoke reports Modi seemed most focused on attracting foreign investment and trade to increase job opportunities for his people.
Video

Video Malaysia Struggles to Stop People Joining Jihad

Malaysian authorities say militant groups like the so-called "Islamic State" have used social media to entice at least three dozen Malaysian Muslims to fight in what they call "jihad" in Syria and Iraq. As Mahi Ramkrishnan reports from Kuala Lumpur, counterterrorism police are deeply worried about what could happen when these militants return home.
Video

Video Could US Have Done More to Stop Rise of Islamic State?

President Obama says airstrikes against Islamic State militants in Syria will likely continue for some time because, in his words, "there is a cancer that has grown for too long." So what if President Obama had acted sooner in Syria to arm more-moderate opponents of both the Islamic State and the Syrian government? VOA State Department Correspondent Scott Stearns reports from the United Nations.
Video

Video Treasure Hunters Seek 'Hidden Treasure' in Central Kenya

Could a cave in a small village in central Kenya be the site of buried treasure? A rumor of riches, left behind by colonialists, has some residents dreaming of wealth, while others see it as a dangerous hoax. VOA's Gabe Joselow has the story.
Video

Video Ebola Patients Find No Treatment at Sierra Leone Holding Center

At a holding facility in Makeni, central Sierra Leone, dozens of sick people sit on the floor in an empty university building. They wait in filthy conditions. It's a 16-hour drive by ambulance to Kailahun Ebola treatment center. Adam Bailes was there and reports on what he says are some of the worst situations he has seen since the beginning of this Ebola outbreak. And he says it appears case numbers may already be far worse than authorities acknowledge.
Video

Video Identifying Bodies Found in Texas Border Region

Thousands of immigrants have died after crossing the border from Mexico into remote areas of the southwestern United States in recent years. Local officials in south Texas alone have found hundreds of unidentified bodies and buried them in mass graves in local cemeteries. Now an anthropologist and her students at Baylor University have been exhuming bodies and looking for clues to identify them. VOA’s Greg Flakus has more from Waco, Texas.
Colonel Steve ‘Spiros’ Pisanos left Greece and came to the U.S. to learn to fly. He flew fighters for the Allies in World War II, narrowly escaping death multiple times.Colonel Steve ‘Spiros’ Pisanos left Greece and came to the U.S. to learn to fly. He flew fighters for the Allies in World War II, narrowly escaping death multiple times.

AppleAndroid