News / Asia

N. Korea Moves Missiles From Launch Site: US Officials

A man using his phone walks past South Korean soldiers wearing protective gears during an anti-biochemical terrorism exercise at a subway station in Seoul, May 7, 2013.
A man using his phone walks past South Korean soldiers wearing protective gears during an anti-biochemical terrorism exercise at a subway station in Seoul, May 7, 2013.
VOA News
U.S. officials believe North Korea has removed two mid-range missiles from imminent-launch status, in an apparent further easing of tensions on the Korean peninsula.

Speaking anonymously late Monday, Washington defense officials said Pyongyang recently moved the two Musudan missiles from a launch site on the country's east coast.  South Korean media are also reporting the move.

Washington had for weeks warned North Korea could launch the untested Musudan missiles, which have a range of up to 3,500 kilometers and could reach several U.S. targets in the region.

Daniel Russel, the White House Senior Director for Asian Affairs, says it is premature to celebrate the move as "good news," warning that U.S. officials cannot rule out a test.

North Korea has gradually reduced the intensity of its rhetoric, following weeks of threats of nuclear and conventional attacks against the U.S. and South Korea.

It also comes just before South Korean President Park Geun-hye meets Tuesday in Washington with U.S. President Barack Obama, for talks likely to focus on Pyongyang.

South Korean President Park Geun-hye lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery, May 6, 2013.South Korean President Park Geun-hye lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery, May 6, 2013.
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South Korean President Park Geun-hye lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery, May 6, 2013.
South Korean President Park Geun-hye lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery, May 6, 2013.
Park began her five-day visit to the United States at the United Nations on Monday. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon praised the South Korean president for what he called her "firm, but measured" response to provocations by North Korea.

At a dinner event for Korean Americans held in Washington Monday night, President Park said her government is responding to North Korean threats in a "firm and calm manner" by coordinating with the international community, including both the United States and China. She said South Korea is open to establishing a cooperative relationship with its northern neighbor.

"If North Korea stops its provocations and moves toward a right path embraced by the international community, even at this moment we will open the way for the prosperity of the two Koreas through an inter-Korean trust building process," she said.

The South Korean leader is also scheduled to address a joint meeting of Congress on Wednesday. President Park, who is heading a delegation of more than 50 South Korean business leaders, will stop in Los Angeles Thursday to meet with Korean entrepreneurs.

White House officials say the trip is meant to reaffirm the U.S. commitment of the defense of South Korea.

Pyongyang has been upset at United Nations sanctions that were expanded in response to its latest nuclear test. It also responded angrily to annual joint military exercises between the U.S. and South Korea.

Slide show on North Korea

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un visits the Turf Institute of the Bioengineering Branch under the State Academy of Sciences in Pyongyang. (KCNA)
  • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un visits a construction site of the North Korean army, May 7, 2013. (KCNA)
  • South Korean protesters wear masks of U.S. President Barack Obama and South Korean President Park Geun-hye during a rally denouncing their policy toward North Korea near the U.S. Embassy in Seoul, May 6, 2013.
  • South Korean vehicles returning from North Korea's Kaesong arrive at the customs, immigration and quarantine office near the border village of Panmunjom, in Paju, South Korea, April 30, 2013.
  • A South Korean vehicle loaded with goods from North Korea's Kaesong arrives at the customs, immigration and quarantine office near the border village of Panmunjom, in Paju, South Korea, April 30, 2013.
  • A TV reporter prepares for a news report in front of an empty gate at the customs, immigration and quarantine (CIQ) office in Paju, South Korea, April 29, 2013.
  • An open gate at a military checkpoint of the inter-Korean transit office in the border city of Paju on April 29, 2013.
  • Media wait for South Koreans returning home from North Korea's Kaesong at the customs office near the border village of Panmunjom that separates the two Koreas, in Paju, South Korea, April 29, 2013.

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by: JKF from: Ottawa, Canada
May 07, 2013 11:59 AM
Let us hope that the situation continues to normalize; it is certainly looking that much of the escalation in tensions, was related to demonstrating the hardness/ideological committment to the past, of the new leader... I hope that is the case, and the demonstration is over. A new approach to negotiations is clearly necessary, because an unstable Korean peninsula, is not a good outcome for anyone. The new approach, that needs to be tested, is to actually engage the new leader directly in the negotiations. Beating around the bush, with intermediaries, in my opinion will not produce real positive changes. As in other conflicts, pre-conditions will not lead to successful negotiations, pre-conditions may not even lead to any negotiations. The reality of the situation, on the ground in terms of the current status, including the nuclear weapons/ballistic programs need to be addressed, and so is the dire economic and dire human rights situation in NKorea. All these issues need to be turned into a positive direction through direct contacts and confidence building measures..

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