News / Europe

'Right Wing' Man Charged in Norway Massacre

Armed police officers are seen on the island of Utoya, Norway, July 23, 2011
Armed police officers are seen on the island of Utoya, Norway, July 23, 2011

Multimedia

Audio

Norwegian police are questioning the suspected gunman who shot and killed at least 85 people at a youth summer camp hours after he allegedly set off a bomb blast that killed seven people in the capital, Oslo.  Police are also investigating the possibility there might have been a second gunman involved in the attack.

Police say the primary suspect in the attack is Norwegian Anders Behring Breivik, 32.  They say Breivik has posted extreme right-wing and anti-Muslim comments online.

A screen grab of the Twitter account reported to belong to Anders Behring Breivik with a single message that reads, "One person with a belief is equal to the force of 100 000 who have only interests," July 23, 2011
Photo: Twitter
A screen grab of the Twitter account reported to belong to Anders Behring Breivik with a single message that reads, "One person with a belief is equal to the force of 100 000 who have only interests," July 23, 2011.

But at a news conference Saturday, Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg said it is too soon to draw any conclusions about what motivated the attack.

"Compared to other countries I would not say that we have a big problem with right-wing extremists in Norway," Stoltenberg said.  "But we have some groups - we have followed them before - and our police is aware that there are some right-wing extreme groups or at least has been some groups of that kind in Norway."

Footage of youth summer camp, Oslo bombing, and Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg

Two separate violent attacks took place on Friday. In mid-afternoon at least one bomb exploded near the Prime Minister's offices in central Oslo. Within hours, at least one gunman opened fire at a youth camp on nearby Otoeya island.

Young people aged 14 to 18 were gathered for a summer camp organized by the Prime Minister's Labor Party. They fled in panic as the gunman, dressed as a police man, opened fire, reportedly shooting at random.  Video shows bodies floating in the water around the island.

Norway's national news agency NTB said Saturday that witnesses on the island have told police two people were involved.  They said the man already in custody was disguised as a policeman, wearing a sweater with a police emblem on it, but that the second man was not.

Media reports in Norway also say the Oslo bomb was made from fertilizer and that a supplier linked a company owned by Breivik to the purchase of fertilizer.

Prime Minister Stoltenberg says the country is united in grief.

"Norway is a small country, but we are a proud country, and we are all very close especially in the times like this," Stoltenberg said.  "And I think that all Norwegians feel very close to those who are victims of the violence in Oslo and the youth camp of the young Labor party Otoeya."

On Saturday, Stoltenberg traveled to a hotel near the island, where rescue teams have been transporting survivors.  Meanwhile, Emergency teams in downtown Oslo are also still at work looking for bodies and survivors of the massive blast that tore through the Prime Minister's office and the finance ministry.

Mikal Hem, a journalist based in Oslo, told VOA the explosion could be heard from many kilometers away.  

"We heard an explosion and the building was shaking," said Hem.  "I ran to the window and I saw smoke coming up from the Prime Minister's office."

He says walking past the site later, he saw buildings in tatters.

Hem says Norwegians are in mourning, a grief he says is heightened by the youth of those targeted on the island.

"This is the most terrible incident in Norway since the war so people are shocked and disturbed and sad," Hem added.  "These are people as young as 14, 15 years old. It's just terrible."

In an annual report released earlier this year, Norway's police security agency noted a rise in far-right activity, but said that growth was limited by a lack of strong leadership.

This is the deadliest attack in Europe since 2004, when a train bombing in Madrid killed 191 people.

You May Like

Is West Doing Enough to Tackle Islamic State?

There is growing uncertainty over whether West’s response to ISIS is adequate More

China Crackdown on Dual Citizens Causes Concern

New policy encourages reporting people who obtain citizenship in another country, but retain Chinese citizenship; move spurs sharp debate More

Video Coalition to Fight Islamic State Could Reward Assad

Losing ground to Islamic State fighters, Syria's government says it is ready to cooperate with international community More

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Ukraine Accuses Russia of Territorial Incursionsi
X
Zlatica Hoke
August 28, 2014 4:07 AM
Ukraine says a key border town (Novoazovsk) and surrounding areas of in southeastern Ukraine have fallen under the control of Russia's military. President Poroshenko says "Russian troops have actually been brought into Ukraine." Despite repeated denials from Moscow, Ukraine accuses the Kremlin of providing weapons and fighters to separatists in eastern Ukraine, toward the Russian leadership's alleged goal of annexing that strategic territory. Zlatica Hoke reports.
Video

Video Ukraine Accuses Russia of Territorial Incursions

Ukraine says a key border town (Novoazovsk) and surrounding areas of in southeastern Ukraine have fallen under the control of Russia's military. President Poroshenko says "Russian troops have actually been brought into Ukraine." Despite repeated denials from Moscow, Ukraine accuses the Kremlin of providing weapons and fighters to separatists in eastern Ukraine, toward the Russian leadership's alleged goal of annexing that strategic territory. Zlatica Hoke reports.
Video

Video Made in America Socks Get Toehold in Online Fashion Market

Three young entrepreneurs are hoping to revolutionize the high-end sock industry by introducing all-American creations of their own. And they’re doing most of it the old-fashioned way. VOA’s Julie Taboh recently caught up with them to learn what goes into making their one-of-a-kind socks.
Video

Video Americans, Ex-Pats Send Relief Supplies to West Africa

Health organizations from around the world are sending supplies and specialists to the West African countries that are dealing with the worst Ebola outbreak in history. On a smaller scale, ordinary Americans and African expatriates living in the United States are doing the same. VOA's Carol Pearson reports.
Video

Video America's Most Popular Artworks Displayed in Public Places

Public places in cities across America were turned into open-air art galleries in August. Pictures of the nation’s most popular artworks were displayed on billboards, bus shelters, subway platforms and more. The idea behind “Art Everywhere,” a collaborative campaign by five major museums is to allow more people to enjoy art and learn about the country’s culture and history. Faiza Elmasry has more.
Video

Video Chinese Doctors Use 3-D Spinal Implant

A Chinese boy suffering from a debilitating bone disease has become the first patient with a part of his spine created in a three-dimensional printer. Doctors say he will soon regain normal mobility. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video Uneasy Calm Settles Over Israel, Gaza Strip

Israel and the Gaza Strip have been calm since a cease-fire set in Tuesday evening, ending seven weeks of hostilities. Hamas, which controls Gaza, declared victory. Israelis were more wart. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Jerusalem.
Video

Video India’s Leprosy Battle Stymied by Continuing Stigma

Medical advancements in the treatment of leprosy have greatly diminished its impact around the world, largely eliminating the disease from most countries. India made great strides in combating leprosy, but still accounts for a majority of the world’s new cases each year, and the number of newly infected Indians is rising - more than 130,000 recorded last year. Doctors there say the problem has more to do with society than science. Shaikh Azizur Rahman reports from Kolkata.
Video

Video Scientists Unlock Mystery of Bird Flocks

How can flocks of birds, schools of fish or herds of antelope suddenly change direction -- all the individuals adjusting their movement in concert, at seemingly the same time? British researchers now have some insights into this behavior, which has puzzled scientists for a long time. VOA's George Putic has more.

AppleAndroid