News / Europe

Putin Backs Proposed Ban on US Adoptions

Cadets watch Russian President Vladimir Putin's annual news conference on television, Rostov-on-Don, Dec. 20, 2012.
Cadets watch Russian President Vladimir Putin's annual news conference on television, Rostov-on-Don, Dec. 20, 2012.
— Russian President Vladimir Putin touched on many topics in his end-of-year address, including U.S.-Russian relations, the conflict in Syria and his health. One topic, however, seemed to garner particular attention from the Russian leader - a law passed by Washington that punishes Russians who abuse human rights. 
 
In his speech, Putin expressed anger over the U.S. Congress' recent passage of the so-called Magnitsky Act. The legislation requires Washington to freeze the assets of and bar entry to anyone who was allegedly involved in the 2009 death of Russian anti-corruption lawyer Sergei Magnitsky.
 
Magnitsky worked for Russia’s largest Western investment fund and claimed to have uncovered a scheme used by Russian officials to embezzle more than $230 million in taxes paid by that firm. He was later arrested by the same officials he had accused of the tax fraud. He died in prison awaiting trial on corruption charges.
 
Putin says the Magnitsky Act is not good for U.S.-Russia relations.
 
He says the bill is unfriendly towards Russia and that Washington is trying to remain in the past. He goes on to say that the measure is "very bad" and is poisoning relations between Russia and the United States.
 
The Kremlin has responded in kind to the Magnitsky Act. The State Duma, the country’s lower house of parliament, has overwhelmingly passed an adoption amendment that would bar Americans from adopting Russian children.
 
Putin says the measure was an adequate response because America is not taking care of the children it adopts from Russia.
 
He says that when crimes are committed against adopted Russian children, America’s judiciary most often does not react to this at all and does not bring criminal charges against people who clearly committed a crime against a child.
 
The adoption amendment must pass a third reading in the Duma and clear the upper house before it goes to Putin for his signature and becomes law.
 
Meanwhile, also in response to the Magnitsky Act, Russia has given initial approval to a law that would penalize Americans accused of violating the human rights of Russian citizens abroad. Those blacklisted would be banned from entering Russia and would be subject to asset freezes.
 
In his speech, Putin also addressed the civil war in Syria, saying that any solution to the conflict there must ensure that President Bashar al-Assad’s government and the Syrian opposition do not simply swap positions and the fighting continues without end. 
 
For the first time, the president appeared to acknowledge a future Syrian government without Assad.  Russia has been a long-time ally of Syria and a major arms seller to the country. Moscow continues to maintain a naval base there.
 
The Kremlin has also refused to back three rounds of sanctions against the Assad government, saying dialogue with both sides is necessary for peace. Putin has also consistently maintained that it is not the job of the United Nations Security Council to promote regime change.
 
The Russian leader also addressed press reports that his back has been hurting him, saying he is in perfect health.

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by: Anonymous
December 20, 2012 7:39 PM
Hahaha, too funny. All Putin has done is gotten himself in deeper. It's kind of like stepping in doo doo, you have to get it off your shoe afterwards... Putin is totally choked about the American government wanting human rights in Russia. So choked he does something so childlike by taking away Russian adoption. He is acting like a 4 year old and all he has done is gotten himself in deeper. American requests for Human Rights in Russia was warranted, and appropriate. What Putin has done however isn't going matter much anyways. Putin should learn a little bit about practising human rights. It's unfortunate those kids whom can't be adopted will be stuck living in Russia with a corrupt, ruthless, government. Now for Putins turn to get slapped in the face harder by the US on their next decisions. Hopefully countries around the world will follow suit with the US and push Russia into a free place with or without Putin.


by: Stephen Sadd from: Australia
December 20, 2012 2:25 PM
It's about time the US got some of it's own medicine, it would be really cool to see both Russia and China take this further, and fund terrorist squads to invade America and shoot and bomb everyone and everything, with maximum concentration around Washington DC. I would support this, being an Aussie!


by: Kevin from: Atlanta, GA
December 20, 2012 1:43 PM
"He says that when crimes are committed against adopted Russian children, America’s judiciary most often does not react to this at all and does not bring criminal charges against people who clearly committed a crime against a child."

Where is there any evidence of this?


by: Hank walden from: Orinda, ca
December 20, 2012 1:34 PM
That is good news for potential adopters. We have experience and have spoken to adopting parents and followed the news. Working in Russian orphanages is a high paying prestigious job and faced with American adopting parents they will offer children that are ill, problematic and often suffering from fetal alchoholic syndrome and will require special attention and medical care. Having children examined by a Russian doctor will not help one get honest medical evaluation. Thank you Putin and adopt American,or in other countries where you deal with a honest system. Do your research talk to other parents about their experience with other countries. Good luck.

In Response

by: Bill from: Nashville
December 21, 2012 7:41 AM
Where did you ever get the crazy idea that working in a Russian orphanage is a well-paid, prestigious job?!! It is not. I have lived in Russia and I visited several orphanages. They are depressing, dingy resource-starved places held together by local women volunteers helping heroic female doctors working for $300 a month. Russian people don't adopt their orphan children. During Soviet times orphans were the responsibility of the State and that is still the public mindset. Putin doesn't care about the children. He is happy to use them as pawns in his geo-political game.


by: a horse from: us
December 20, 2012 1:22 PM
It is really not US's interest if Russia wants to continue to practice corruption. Actually the more corrupted Russia is, it would be less of a threat to the US in the future. Hence I am mystified by the side of the bread that is buttered


by: AK from: Canada
December 20, 2012 1:15 PM
Good. Poverty, foster care, hardship, it is not bad and maybe will even strengthen the character of kids. NOTHING is worse for children then being infected with American disease. That country is literally hell on earth, no mater how much money they have they are miserable. The only place people are happy in the USA is in rural areas, the other 95% are miserable slugs despite 21% of the population being on happy pills. It is a death trap, full of negroids and everything else undesirable, it is totally destroyed at a genetic level.


by: Bert from: Los Angeles
December 20, 2012 1:13 PM
Yeah! Let them drown in their own overpopulation. We got more than enough bad seed already going around over here.

In Response

by: Anonymous
December 21, 2012 11:15 PM
Let them drown in their own overpopulation?

Russia's population is declining.


by: Random Numbers from: USA
December 20, 2012 1:06 PM
Wait, I'll blacklist myself! Problem solved Vladichka!


by: Anonymous
December 20, 2012 1:03 PM
How...bizarre.

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