News / Middle East

    Syrian Air Strike Hits School, Killing 18, Many of Them Children

    This photo provided by the anti-government activist group Aleppo Media Center, which has been authenticated based on its contents and AP reporting, shows a damaged school that was hit by a Syrian government air strike in Aleppo, Syria, April 30, 2014.
    This photo provided by the anti-government activist group Aleppo Media Center, which has been authenticated based on its contents and AP reporting, shows a damaged school that was hit by a Syrian government air strike in Aleppo, Syria, April 30, 2014.
    Margaret Besheer
    An air strike by Syrian fighter jets hit a school in the northern city of Aleppo on Wednesday, killing 18 people - many of them children.
     
    Activists, including the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, said the air strike hit the Ain Jalout school in the Al-Ansari district of Aleppo.
     
    Videos posted by the activists show blood and debris and the bodies of at least 10 children on the floor.
     
    The Observatory says at least 18 people died in the attack, while the Aleppo Media Center says 25 children were killed.
     
    The United Nations Children's Fund said it is "outraged by the latest wave of indiscriminate attacks perpetrated against schools and other civilian targets across Syria."
     
    At least 150,000 people have been killed in Syria's 3-year-old civil war, a third of them civilians, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.
     
    • Men react as they carry the body of a relative, whom activists say was killed by barrel bombs dropped by forces loyal to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad in Aleppo's al-Sakhour district, April 30, 2014.
    • This photo provided by the anti-government activist group Aleppo Media Center shows a damaged school that was hit by a Syrian government air strike in Aleppo, April 30, 2014.
    • This photo provided by the anti-government activist group Aleppo Media Center shows two Syrian men standing inside a school that was hit by a Syrian government air strike in Aleppo, April. 30, 2014.
    • People gather at the site of two car bomb attacks at al-Abassia roundabout in Homs, April 29, 2014. (SANA)
    • People gather at the site of two car bomb attacks at al-Abassia roundabout in Homs, April 29, 2014. (SANA)
    • A boy who was injured after mortar bombs landed on two areas in Damascus is seen in a hospital, April 29, 2014.
    • Residents inspect damage from mortar bombs that landed in Badr al-Din al-Hussein school complex, a religious college in Bab Saghir, Damascus, April 29, 2014.
    • A mortar shell is seen in front of vehicles after mortars landed on two areas in Damascus, April 29, 2014. (SANA)
    At the United Nations on Wednesday, U.N. humanitarian chief Valerie Amos said that the Security Council resolution intended to improve humanitarian access to millions of people in Syria is not working and the council must do more.
     
    After briefing the council for two hours in a closed session, Amos said that in the two months since the council unanimously adopted resolution 2139 the hoped for changes on the ground have not come.
     
    In resolution 2139, the council unanimously demanded the parties facilitate the quick and safe delivery of aid, including across conflict and border lines.
     
    “Far from getting better, the situation is getting worse. Violence has intensified over the past month taking a horrific toll on ordinary Syrians,” Amos said.

    She said public pressure and private diplomacy have yielded very little progress, and it is now up to the council to act to get aid to the more than 9 million people inside Syria who desperately need it, especially those under siege and in hard-to-reach areas.

    While the U.N. and its agencies have succeeded in getting limited aid to millions of Syrians, Amos said it is not enough.

    While she did not say if she explicitly asked the council to adopt a resolution under Chapter 7 of the U.N. Charter that would allow the council to take stronger action to implement its demands, Amos said she reminded them that in Bosnia and Somalia it took several Chapter 7 resolutions to ultimately get the access humanitarians needed.

    French Ambassador Gérard Araud was not optimistic that the 15-nation council would be able to act in a unified way to take further measures.

    “My personal feeling is, unfortunately after what I heard, nothing that we could table to the council could pass. Really, we have the impression of an unconditional defense of the regime,” Araud said.
     
    Russia, which along with China, has used its veto on three occasions to protect the Assad regime, would be likely to block any tough council action.

    The Syrian opposition coalition representative in New York, Najib Ghadbian, urged the U.N. to move ahead with cross-border access - with or without Syrian government consent - to save Syrian lives.

    A report from U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon issued last week paints a grim picture, saying two months after resolution 2139 “none of the parties to the conflict have adhered to the demands of the council.”
     
    Ban warned that denying food and life-saving medical supplies is arbitrary and unjustified and a “clear violation of international humanitarian law.”
     
    Western powers have urged Syria’s referral to the International Criminal Court at The Hague.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Anonymous
    May 01, 2014 2:15 AM
    Assad will have to face murder charges for every Syrian he murdered. He killed sooooo many children, wounded thousands too.
    In Response

    by: ali baba from: new york
    May 01, 2014 10:31 AM
    you can add Assad in murder list.Do not forget to add Saudi and gulf countries whom supported terrorist and produce fatwa to justify raping woman and give it a fantasy name sexual jihad

    by: MUSTAFA from: INDIA
    April 30, 2014 11:01 PM
    Who is responsible for these human and property losses. All the main players, directors and financers are responsible for these losses which no body can measure or feel them self. This is big human tragedy of this decade. Just to CHANGE REGIME, we played this dirty drama. We are rich, power full and have gangs of Terrorist to increase as much as possible human sufferings. But for a movement any big player can think what would be their position after death. What would be their reply in front of God, We can tell lie in our whole life and play dirty politics for our own satisfaction. But no body can tell lie in front of GOD, so be ready of your reply. Your hand with human blood will tell the true story in front of God.

    by: Jim Swayne from: Walla Walla, WA usa
    April 30, 2014 6:08 PM
    I am a lifelong Democrat and generally support President Obama's policies. However, it the case of Syria it seems the USA is being cowardly and afraid to challenge the Syrian government in any meaningful way. In my opinion it is past time for military action against the war criminals in charge in Syria.
    In Response

    by: ali baba from: new york
    May 01, 2014 3:10 AM
    United State is not the world police man. We should not interfere in any conflict in the world and let our children and resources exhausted. first Bashar el Assad is not a bad president. the country was live in peace . they have different branches of Islam. they have Christian and Jew as well. then Saudi and terrorist organization involve in that conflict and country conversed in large scale war. Muslim fanatic has caused serious problem in Lebanon ,Syria ,Sudan . when a Muslim is killing other Muslim ,it is ok. if American interfere , both side with attack American such as Iraq. both side attack American in Iraq war . now they kill each other and it will continue for ever. United state will not change the ideology of Islam which is marked by killing and terrorist. that is their culture and let them continue killing each other until they understand that killing and war is not the solution for world problem

    by: Charles Babb
    April 30, 2014 5:55 PM
    It's time for the west to take their collective thumbs out of their bums and set a no fly zone over Syria. Obama and the rest of the free world needs to put a stop to the bombing. To do less is cowardly and inhumane.

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