Middle East

    • A blind child carries a dove at a protest against the attack on the al-Nour Center for the Blind in Sana'a, Yemen, Jan. 10, 2016. Students say neither the school, nor themselves, have taken any side in the war. (A. Mojalli/VOA)
    • Five people were injured in the airstrike in January 2016 at the center in Sana'a, Yemen, and Human Rights Watch says the bomb didn’t explode, preventing a greater tragedy. (A. Mojalli/VOA)
    • Human Rights Watch says nearly 6,000 people have been disabled since the Saudi-led coalition began airstrikes nine months ago. (A. Mojalli/VOA)
    • The al-Nour center is Sana’a’s only school for the blind, serving roughly 250 people and housing more than 100. (A. Mojalli/VOA)
    • Human Rights Watch says Houthi militants are partially to blame for putting the center in danger by stationing militiamen near the school. Houthi leaders and school workers deny soldiers were stationed nearby. (A. Mojalli/VOA)
    • An outraged Yemeni public says the attack on Yemen’s most vulnerable children is an attack on humanity. (A. Mojalli/VOA)

    Yemeni Children, Disabled at Risk

    Published January 14, 2016

    After a center for the blind was hit by Saudi-led airstrikes in Yemen, Human Rights Watch says Houthi militants are partially to blame for using civilian sites for military purposes.


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