Vehicles drive on the main Black Rock road, covered with ash coming from the St. Vincent eruption of La Soufriere volcano, on…
Vehicles drive on the main Black Rock road, covered with ash coming from the St. Vincent eruption of La Soufriere volcano, on the outskirts of Bridgetown, Barbados,April 11, 2021.

A volcano on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent fired a large amount of ash and hot gas into the air early Monday, making it the biggest explosive eruption since volcanic activity began last week. 

“It’s destroying everything in its path,” Erouscilla Joseph, director of the University of the West Indies’ Seismic Research Center, told The Associated Press.
 
There were no immediate reports of injuries or deaths following Monday’s eruption of  La Soufriere volcano.
 
Experts are now warning further explosions will occur in the coming days.
 
"Explosions and accompanying ash fall of similar or larger magnitude are likely to continue to occur over the next few days, impacting St. Vincent and neighboring islands," the Seismic Research Center warned.
 
An estimated 16,000 people who live close to the volcano were evacuated under government orders on Thursday as the volcano’s first eruption occurred Friday morning.
 
Heavy ashfall and debris have damaged some buildings, and residents reported widespread power outages on Sunday.
 
An unknown number of people are still located near the volcano as they refuse to move.