Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, center, poses with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, right, and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, for photos before holding talks at the Xijiao Conference Center in Shanghai Wednesday, July 31, 2019. (AP…
FILE - Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, center, poses with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, right, and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, for photos before holding talks at the Xijiao Conference Center in Shanghai, July 31, 2019.

Steve Herman contributed to this report from the White House.

The latest round of trade talks between U.S. and Chinese negotiators ended in Shanghai Wednesday with an agreement to meet again in September in the U.S.

The White House called the talks "constructive" and said "forced technology transfer, intellectual property rights, services, non-tariff barriers, and agriculture" were among the topics negotiators discussed.

"The Chinese side confirmed their commitment to increase purchases of United States agricultural exports," the White House said. The statement also said the U.S. expects "negotiations on an enforceable trade deal to continue in Washington, D.C. in early September."

China's official Xinhua news agency reported the talks were "frank, highly efficient and constructive" and that negotiators discussed "the issue of China increasing its purchases of U.S. agricultural products."

U.S. and Chinese representatives held talks at a working dinner on Tuesday and less than a half day of negotiations on Wednesday before the U.S. delegation headed straight to the airport.

Shortly after U.S. negotiators arrived in Shanghai on Tuesday, U.S. President Donald Trump warned China against negotiating a deal after the 2020 U.S. presidential election  — declaring a delayed agreement would be less attractive than a deal reached in the near term.

"The problem with them waiting ... is that if & when I win, the deal that they get will be much tougher than what we are negotiating now ... or no deal at all," Trump said in a post on Twitter.

Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying responded to Trump's tweet on Wednesday, telling reporters at a daily news briefing in Beijing "it doesn't make any sense for the U.S. to exercise its campiagn of maximum pressure at this time."

Hua also said "It's pointless to tell others to take medication when you're the one who sick."

U.S. and Chinese officials gathered in Shanghai in an attempt to revive talks, with both sides trying to temper expectations for a breakthrough.

The world's two largest economies are engaged in an intense trade war that has dragged on for more than a year, having imposed punitive tariffs on each other totaling more than $360 billion in two-way trade.

The Shanghai negotiations came after Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed at June's G-20 summit to resurrect efforts to end the costly trade war over China's technology ambitions and trade surplus.

China is resisting U.S. demands to abolish government-led plans for industrial leaders to enhance robotics, artificial intelligence and other technologies.

The U.S. has complained China's plans depend on the acquisition of foreign technology through theft or coercion.

Days prior to the Shanghai meeting, Trump threatened to withdraw recognition of China's developing nation's status at the World Trade Organization. China responded by saying the threat is indicative of the "arrogance and selfishness" of the U.S.

The U.S. delegation in Shanghai was represented by Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer. They met with a Chinese delegation led by Vice Premier Liu He, who serves as the country's economic czar.