Queen Elizabeth II inspects the guard of honor before entering Balmoral Castle, Scotland, at the start of her annual holiday, Aug. 6, 2019.
FILE - Queen Elizabeth II inspects the guard of honor before entering Balmoral Castle, Scotland, at the start of her annual holiday, Aug. 6, 2019.

Britain's Queen Elizabeth gave her approval Monday to legislation seeking to block Prime Minister Boris Johnson from carrying out a no-deal Brexit, his plan to take the country out of the European Union on October 31 without spelling out the terms of the split.

FILE - Britain's Queen Elizabeth II welcomes Boris Johnson, then newly-elected leader of the Conservative party, during an audience at Buckingham Palace, London, England, July 24, 2019.

Her action, known as a Royal Assent, came after parliament last week voted against attempts by Johnson to carry out his announced intention for Britain to divorce itself from the EU with or without a deal with Brussels.

Before Johnson took office in July, parliament three times rejected Brexit plans advanced by former Prime Minister Theresa May. Lawmakers in the House of Commons, however, have been unable to reach agreement on British trade practices with the EU after it leaves the 28-nation bloc and how to deal with cross-border passage between Britain's Northern Ireland and EU member Ireland.

Johnson is calling for a snap election on October 15 in an effort to win a parliamentary majority to approve his Brexit plans ahead of an EU summit of the continent's leaders days later that could set the final terms of Britain's departure from the EU.

But lawmakers are expected Monday to reject Johnson's call for an election.

FILE - Anti-Brexit protesters demonstrate outside the Houses of Parliament in London, Sept. 4, 2019.

With that expected outcome, Johnson says parliament will be suspended for five weeks, until the queen gives her annual address to parliament outlining the government's legislative plans for the upcoming year.

Johnson's no-deal Brexit plans have been opposed by a majority of parliamentarians, including 21 Conservative lawmakers, among them Winston Churchill's grandson, who worked to thwart the Tory prime minister. Johnson booted them from the Conservative party.