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Plant Communications

Plants communicate with each other. Scientists believe their chemical "language" could help farmers target pests.

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Jack Schultz, professor of chemical ecology at the University of Missouri. (University of Missouri)
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Jack Schultz, professor of chemical ecology at the University of Missouri. (University of Missouri)

In professor Jack Schultz's lab at the University of Missouri, sophisticated equipment samples the aromatic chemicals released as a plant's leaves are eaten by a caterpillar. (University of Missouri 2011)
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In professor Jack Schultz's lab at the University of Missouri, sophisticated equipment samples the aromatic chemicals released as a plant's leaves are eaten by a caterpillar. (University of Missouri 2011)

In professor Jack Schultz's laboratory at the University of Missouri, special equipment is used to read plants' chemical "language". (University of Missouri 2011)
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In professor Jack Schultz's laboratory at the University of Missouri, special equipment is used to read plants' chemical "language". (University of Missouri 2011)

In professor James Cahill's lab at the University of Alberta, a small camera that can capture tiny images of roots is inserted through a plexiglass tube buried in the soil. (Pamela Belter)
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In professor James Cahill's lab at the University of Alberta, a small camera that can capture tiny images of roots is inserted through a plexiglass tube buried in the soil. (Pamela Belter)

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