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After Landslide Victory, Putin Faces Public Backlash

Prime Minister Vladimir Putin won a landslide victory in Russia's presidential elections Sunday. The morning after, he woke up to a new challenge: Russia's increasingly empowered urban middle class.

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Some 15,000 people gathered on Pushkin Square in downtown Moscow to protest the results of Sunday's presidential elections, March 5, 2012, (VOA - Y. Weeks).
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Some 15,000 people gathered on Pushkin Square in downtown Moscow to protest the results of Sunday's presidential elections, March 5, 2012, (VOA - Y. Weeks).

Protesters with a sign that reads, "If not us, then who?." One of Putin's campaign slogans was, "If not Putin, then who?" March 5, 2012, (VOA - Y. Weeks).
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Protesters with a sign that reads, "If not us, then who?." One of Putin's campaign slogans was, "If not Putin, then who?" March 5, 2012, (VOA - Y. Weeks).

Nikita Bogoyavlensky, a 19-year-old computer science student and young communist, said he came to the protest because he was dissatisfied with Sunday's election results. "We've already lived under Putin and our country is falling apart," March 5, 2012. (V
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Nikita Bogoyavlensky, a 19-year-old computer science student and young communist, said he came to the protest because he was dissatisfied with Sunday's election results. "We've already lived under Putin and our country is falling apart," March 5, 2012. (V

A sign hangs from an apartment balcony reads, "Men don't cry." On Sunday evening, Vladimir Putin spoke to a large crowd of supporters and appeared to tear up on camera, March 5, 2012, (VOA - Y. Weeks).
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A sign hangs from an apartment balcony reads, "Men don't cry." On Sunday evening, Vladimir Putin spoke to a large crowd of supporters and appeared to tear up on camera, March 5, 2012, (VOA - Y. Weeks).

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