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Victims of Former Chadian President Hissene Habré​ and Those Bringing Him to Justice

A court in Senegal has found former Chadian president Hissene Habre guilty of crimes against humanity, war crimes and torture and sentenced him to life in prison. Judge Kam said Habre presided over eight years of "uninterrupted" repression. Rights groups say Habre was responsible for over 40,000 killings.
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Souleymane Guengueng watched dozens of fellow cellmates die from torture and disease during three years in Habré’s prisons. Guengueng took an oath that if he ever got out of jail alive, he would bring his tormentors to justice.
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Souleymane Guengueng watched dozens of fellow cellmates die from torture and disease during three years in Habré’s prisons. Guengueng took an oath that if he ever got out of jail alive, he would bring his tormentors to justice.

For 16 years, Reed Brody has been the strategist and guiding force behind the campaign. His 2001 discovery of the files of Habré’s political police revealed the names of thousands of victims and provided crucial evidence in court.
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For 16 years, Reed Brody has been the strategist and guiding force behind the campaign. His 2001 discovery of the files of Habré’s political police revealed the names of thousands of victims and provided crucial evidence in court.

Jacqueline Moudeina, the victims’ lead lawyer, has risked everything, including her life, to bring Habré to justice. An icon of dignity, she still has shrapnel in her leg from 2001, when one of Habré's security chiefs, who had returned as police chief of
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Jacqueline Moudeina, the victims’ lead lawyer, has risked everything, including her life, to bring Habré to justice. An icon of dignity, she still has shrapnel in her leg from 2001, when one of Habré's security chiefs, who had returned as police chief of

Clement Abaifouta was called the "gravedigger" because his job during four years in prison was to bury the bodies of deceased detainees in mass graves. Now he is the president of the main victims’ association.
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Clement Abaifouta was called the "gravedigger" because his job during four years in prison was to bury the bodies of deceased detainees in mass graves. Now he is the president of the main victims’ association.

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