Accessibility links

Breaking News
USA

Hurricane Harvey Threatens Homes, Increases Energy Costs


Ramon Lopez boards up windows of a business in Galveston, Texas, as Hurricane Harvey intensifies in the Gulf of Mexico, Aug. 25, 2017.

Hurricane Harvey's impact on the U.S. economy began even before it made landfall, boosting the cost of crude oil and gasoline, and raising concerns about $40 billion worth of homes in harm's way.

The Gulf of Mexico region is home to nearly one-fifth of the nation's crude oil output and almost half the refining capacity in the United States. Energy production could be hampered as storm winds, shipping crude oil and refined products could be prevented by flooding and storm surges, and the storm could damage complex, expensive refineries and other facilities.

Oil companies have evacuated people from some of their most vulnerable offshore facilities and have reduced or stopped production at some operations.

Aaron Berg fills up a gas can and his portable generator, Aug. 24, 2017, in Houston, as Hurricane Harvey intensifies in the Gulf of Mexico.
Aaron Berg fills up a gas can and his portable generator, Aug. 24, 2017, in Houston, as Hurricane Harvey intensifies in the Gulf of Mexico.

Crude oil prices rose Friday morning on concerns that storm disruptions could limit supplies.

Officials say Harvey's storm surge could push sea water levels as much as two meters higher than normal for the threatened coastal area. That could place 200,000 homes, which could cost tens of billions to completely rebuild, in danger, according to CoreLogic, a firm that gathers and analyzes data on real estate.

More than half the threatened homes are in the Houston area, while many of the rest are around Beaumont and Port Arthur.

XS
SM
MD
LG