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Las Vegas Hotel Sues 2017 Mass Shooting Victims


FILE - A couple looks over 58 wooden crosses, with the names and photos of the October 1 mass shooting victims, in the median of Las Vegas Boulevard South near the "Welcome to Las Vegas" sign in Las Vegas, Nevada, Oct. 9, 2017.

The owners of the Las Vegas hotel that was the scene of the worst mass shooting in U.S. history is counter-suing victims who are suing the hotel for negligence.

Fifty-eight people were killed and hundreds wounded when Stephen Paddock fired on a concert from his room at the Mandalay Bay hotel in October. Paddock killed himself as police moved in.

Hundreds of victims have filed suit against MGM Resorts, which owns the Mandalay Bay, accusing the company of negligence for failing to monitor the hotel's guests and for allowing Paddock to stockpile an arsenal of high-powered weapons and ammunition in his room in the days leading up to the massacre.

MGM Resorts, filed suit against the victims last week, alleging those wounded or whose relatives were killed cannot sue the hotel.

Madisen Silva, right, and Samantha Werner embrace at a makeshift memorial for victims of a mass shooting in Las Vegas, Oct. 6, 2017.
Madisen Silva, right, and Samantha Werner embrace at a makeshift memorial for victims of a mass shooting in Las Vegas, Oct. 6, 2017.

MGM cites a 2002 federal law that limits liabilities against businesses that take certain steps to "prevent and respond to mass violence."

MGM says the security company it employed at the concert was certified by the Department of Homeland Security.

But Las Vegas lawyer Robert Eglet, who represents about 1000 of the victims, says the company providing security at the hotel, from where Paddock fired his shots, was not certified.

"MGM has done something that in over 30 years of practice is the most outrageous thing I have ever seen. They have sued the families of the victims while they're still grieving over their loved ones," Eglet said.

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