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Company to Launch Diving Tours of Titanic

  • VOA News

The wreckage of RMS Titanic is seen in this handout from Blue Marble Private, a tour company offering diving trips to the famous ship.

A travel company is offering a chance for well heeled travelers to dive the wreck of the RMS Titanic.

Beginning in May of next year, Blue Marble Private says it will offer a chance for nine travelers to dive some 4,000 meters below the surface of the ocean to see the famous wreck.

According to the company’s website, customers will dive “in a specially designed titanium and carbon fiber submersible, guided by a crew of experts.”

Photographs of the Titanic are displayed in a family album at the Transport museum in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Oct. 14, 2014.
Photographs of the Titanic are displayed in a family album at the Transport museum in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Oct. 14, 2014.

“You will glide over the ship’s deck and famous grand staircase capturing a view that very few have seen, or ever will,” the company added.

Tourists will also “explore Titanic’s massive debris field, home to numerous artifacts strewn across the ocean floor, nearly undisturbed for over a century,” according to Blue Marble Private founder Elizabeth Ellis.

According to CNN, the first trip is already sold out. The price for the eight-day adventure? $105,129 per person, which is about double the price charged by Deep Ocean Expeditions charged when it brought tourists to the wreck in 2012.

Time to visit the famous wreck may be running out.

CNN reported that a 2016 study said “extremophile bacteria” will likely dissolve what’s left of the ill-fated ship within 15 to 20 years.

An iron-oxide eating microbe was discovered forming icicle-shaped rusticles on the legendary shipwreck, the Titanic. (RMS Titanic Inc.)
An iron-oxide eating microbe was discovered forming icicle-shaped rusticles on the legendary shipwreck, the Titanic. (RMS Titanic Inc.)

In the early hours of April 15, 1912, the “unsinkable” Titanic struck an iceberg in the North Atlantic while making its maiden voyage from Southampton, England, to New York City. On board were 2,224 passengers, more than 1,500 of whom died as the ship quickly sunk.

The wreckage was first discovered 32 years ago.

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