Accessibility links

South Sudan Women Break Through 'Grease' Ceiling

When she was a little girl, Elizabeth Yacob's dream was to become an engineer. But when she was 18 and had finished school, her parents told her there was no money left to pay for higher education. They also said it was high time that Yacob get married.

But Yacob did not want to give up on her dream just yet. Encouraged by her brother, she enrolled in an auto mechanics' school in Yei in 2008. She graduated a year later, fully qualified to drive and work on motor vehicles.
Show more

 Elizabeth Yacob (R) was hired on the spot when she applied for a job as a car mechanic in Juba, South Sudan. Her colleague, Diane Andrew (L), used to be a tea lady but made the leap to servicing cars to make more money.
1

Elizabeth Yacob (R) was hired on the spot when she applied for a job as a car mechanic in Juba, South Sudan. Her colleague, Diane Andrew (L), used to be a tea lady but made the leap to servicing cars to make more money.

Car mechanics Elizabeth Yacob (L) and Diane Andrew service a vehicle at the University of Juba Auto Garage in the South Sudan capital.
2

Car mechanics Elizabeth Yacob (L) and Diane Andrew service a vehicle at the University of Juba Auto Garage in the South Sudan capital.

Only 16 percent of South Sudanese women can read and write, and only 12 percent are formally employed, leaving them very vulnerable when crisis erupts.
3

Only 16 percent of South Sudanese women can read and write, and only 12 percent are formally employed, leaving them very vulnerable when crisis erupts.

XS
SM
MD
LG