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Catalonians Rally in Barcelona to Protest Push for Secession From Spain

  • VOA News

Catalonians are rallying in Barcelona to protest the Catalan government's push for secession from Spain.

Police say 350,000 demonstrators attended, while organizers say more than 900,000 people joined in. The march was peaceful and no major incidents were reported.

"We have perhaps been silent too long," one protester told the French news agency on Sunday.

Last week, Catalonians voted overwhelmingly for independence. In that poll, deemed illegal by Madrid, 90 percent voted to break with Spain, but the turnout was well under half of the electorate.

A woman kisses a ballot before voting at a polling station for the banned independence referendum in Barcelona, Spain, Oct. 1, 2017.
A woman kisses a ballot before voting at a polling station for the banned independence referendum in Barcelona, Spain, Oct. 1, 2017.

Opinion polls have consistently suggested more Catalans favor remaining in Spain than declaring independence.

Organizers say the slogan for Sunday's rally is "Enough, let's recover good sense."

Protesters gathered at Barcelona's Urquinaona square are singing "Viva Espana."

Catalonian leaders, now faced with tough decisions on how to proceed, are calling for dialogue with Spain's national government.

Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy says he will not rule out using constitutional powers to take away Catalonia's autonomous status, if the region declares independence.

FILE - Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy.
FILE - Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy.

In an interview with the Spanish newspaper El Pais published Sunday, Rajoy said that he will consider employing any measure "allowed by the law'' to stop the region's separatists.

On Saturday, thousands of protesters gathered at rallies in Barcelona, Madrid and other Spanish cities to demand dialogue to end the dispute.

Secessionist anger in Catalonia has intensified following the violence last Sunday when Spain’s national police and Civil Guard fired rubber bullets, roughed up Catalans and raided polling stations as part of an effort to disrupt the plebiscite. Catalan authorities say almost 900 people were hurt in the crackdown.

In this Oct. 1, 2017 photo, a Spanish riot police swings a club against would-be voters near a school assigned to be a polling station by the Catalan government in Barcelona, Spain.
In this Oct. 1, 2017 photo, a Spanish riot police swings a club against would-be voters near a school assigned to be a polling station by the Catalan government in Barcelona, Spain.

With the crisis deepening, and no sign of an end to political instability, some Catalan businesses have announced they are relocating their headquarters to other parts of Spain to avoid the possibility of getting knocked out of the European Union common market by a Catalonian secession.

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