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Millennial Life: Eat, Sleep, Work, Screens

FILE - In this Sept. 16, 2017, file photo, a person uses a smartphone in Chicago.
FILE - In this Sept. 16, 2017, file photo, a person uses a smartphone in Chicago.

Would you give up nearly a decade of your life looking at your cellphone?

Calculated by today’s usage, the average person spends a little over 76,500 hours – or 8.74 years – on a smartphone over a lifetime, according to a recent study by a mobile device comparison site, WhistleOut.

Unsurprisingly, millennials (born 1981 to 1996) spend the most time on their phones with an average of about 3.7 hours per day. When subtracting the average sleep time for adults (around nine hours), this amounts to almost one-fourth (23.1%) of their waking lives on a screen.

Generation X (born 1965 to 1980) comes in second with an average of about three hours per day, which amounts to 16.5% of their waking lives. Boomers (1946 to 1965) spend the least amount of time on their phones, with an average of 2.5 hours per day, factoring to about 9.9% of their waking lives.

However, the new generation, Generation Z (born after 1996), seems to dominate their precursors in smartphone usage and screen time: 95% of teens age 13 to 17 reported having a smartphone or having access to one, and 45% reported they are online constantly, according to a 2018 Pew Research study.

In a Twitter thread by a popular American YouTuber, Mr. Beast, fans shared their screen time reports, including how many hours they spend on their phones and what apps they used the most. Some reported screen time of well over 10 hours a day.

The majority of teens aged 13 to 17 (91%) say they use their phones to pass time, but a large share of them also say they use them to connect with others (84%) or learn new things (83%), according to Pew Research.

FILE - Marilu Rodriguez checks a news website on her smartphone before boarding a train home at the end of her workweek in Chicago, March 13, 2015.
FILE - Marilu Rodriguez checks a news website on her smartphone before boarding a train home at the end of her workweek in Chicago, March 13, 2015.

This widespread usage of smartphones has sparked worries among teens themselves, with 54% of U.S. teens saying they spend too much time on their phones. And 52% have also reported trying to take steps to reduce mobile phone use.

A JAMA Network study found that only 5% of 59,397 U.S. high school students surveyed spent a balanced time sleeping and staying physically active while limiting screen time.

Too much time on a phone has been linked to a number of physical and mental health risks.

In a study of 3,826 adolescents, researchers found an association between social media and television use with symptoms of depression, according to JAMA Pediatrics.

Increased screen time has also been linked with a higher risk of obesity and diabetes.

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Learn about religious accommodations in US colleges  

FILE - St. Thomas More Catholic Chapel on the campus of Yale University in New Haven, Conn., March 16, 2022.
FILE - St. Thomas More Catholic Chapel on the campus of Yale University in New Haven, Conn., March 16, 2022.

From prayer services to housing options and vegetarian meal selections, colleges in the United States offer ways to accommodate students of various faiths.

In U.S. News & World Report,Anayat Durrani explains how you can learn about religious accommodations at colleges and universities. (April 2024)

US community colleges create unique bachelor’s degrees

US community colleges create unique bachelor’s degrees
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In the United States, community colleges traditionally give two-year associate’s degrees and certificates. That is changing as more of these colleges develop bachelor’s degree programs. The higher degree from these schools is making college more accessible and affordable nationally and internationally. Robin Guess reports. Camera: Roy Kim.

Purdue U student from Nicaragua loves soccer and her studies

FILE - The Purdue University Marching Band plays with facemasks in place before the start of the Indianapolis 500 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, May 30, 2021.
FILE - The Purdue University Marching Band plays with facemasks in place before the start of the Indianapolis 500 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, May 30, 2021.

A student from Nicaragua blends academics and athletics to excel at Purdue University in the U.S. state of Indiana.

Andrea Martinez talks about her passion for soccer and her studies here. (April 2024)

Writer offers packing tips for international students

FILE - The UCLA campus on April 25, 2019.
FILE - The UCLA campus on April 25, 2019.

Deciding what to bring to college can be daunting.

A student from Singapore writes about her must-haves as an international student in the U.S.

Read it here. (April 2024)

Siblings flourish at University of Cincinnati

FILE - The University of Cincinnati pep band plays during their spring NCAA college football game, April 2, 2016, in Cincinnati.
FILE - The University of Cincinnati pep band plays during their spring NCAA college football game, April 2, 2016, in Cincinnati.

Two sets of siblings -- on from Kuwait and one from Saudi Arabia -- talk about their experiences as international students at the University of Cincinnati in the U.S. state of Ohio.

Read the story here. (April 2024)

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