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US Women’s Soccer Captain Says Oust Owners, Officials Named in Abuse Report


FILE - U.S. captain Becky Sauerbrunn speaks following a women's soccer match against Nigeria, Sept. 6, 2022, in Washington.

United States international captain Becky Sauerbrunn said Tuesday team owners and officials implicated in a bombshell report, which detailed systemic sexual abuse and misconduct in U.S. women's soccer, should be barred from the sport.

The 37-year-old two-time World Cup winner said players were "horrified and heartbroken" by the findings of a report published on Monday following a yearlong investigation by former U.S. Attorney General Sally Yates.

Yates' report included interviews with more than 200 National Women's Soccer League players — many of them members of U.S. national teams — and detailed patterns of abuse from team coaches, manipulation and tirades.

"Every owner and executive and U.S. soccer official who has repeatedly failed the players and failed to protect the players who have hidden behind legalities and have not participated fully in these investigations should be gone," Sauerbrunn said in a videoconference call from London, where the U.S. women's team is preparing for a friendly with England on Friday.

Merritt Paulson, the owner of Sauerbrunn's club, the Portland Thorns, was accused in the Yates report along with other club officials of enabling misconduct by former Thorns manager Paul Riley.

Pressed on whether Paulson was included in the team owners she believes should be forced out of the NWSL, Sauerbrunn replied: "It includes everyone that has continued to fail the players time and time again, who didn't take players concerns seriously, who didn't pass on information correctly, who have not participated in investigations. All of them."

In a separate development on Tuesday, Paulson, who is also the owner of the Portland Timbers Major League Soccer franchise, said he was removing himself from all Thorns-related decision-making until the conclusion of a separate NWSL/NWSL Players Association investigation.

"I cannot apologize enough for our role in a gross systemic failure to protect player safety and the missteps we made in 2015," Paulson said in a statement. "I am truly sorry."

Horrified and heartbroken

Sauerbrunn meanwhile said players were "not doing well” following publication of the findings of the investigation, which was launched last year after reports in The Athletic and The Washington Post lifted the lid on abuse in the NWSL.

"We are horrified and heartbroken and frustrated and exhausted and really, really angry," said Sauerbrunn, a veteran of 208 internationals stretching back to 2008.

"We are angry that it took a third-party investigation. We're angry that it took an article in The Athletic and The Washington Post,” she said. "We're angry that it took over 200 people sharing their trauma to get to this point right now.

"For so long, this has always fallen on the players to demand change. And that is because the people in authority and decision-making positions have repeatedly failed to protect us. And they have failed to hold themselves and each other accountable," she said.

U.S. head coach Vlatko Andonovski, meanwhile, said members of his squad would be given the option of sitting out this week's game against England if they decided they were not in the right frame of mind for the game.

"Some players and staff members need time, need space, need to process all of it," Andonovski said. "That's why we as a staff are allowing the players to think and process to do whatever they need in order to get over this difficult time.

"If that means they don't want to participate in a team meeting, or in a team training, or even if they don't want to play the game, then it's up to them," he said, adding that he was "sickened and disgusted" by the details of the report.

"Now this report is out, it's our job to do our part to make sure that no one has to deal with this ever again in our sport at any level," he added.

Sauerbrunn meanwhile said she has not contemplated the possibility of going on strike to force change in the NWSL.

"I haven't thought about not playing," she said. "I hope it won't get to that point. A lot of us have been navigating these things for a very long time and you find a way to deal with it. We, as women, as players have faced a lot for a very long time. Unfortunately, I'd say you get used to it."

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