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Are You a Victim of Fake News?

Have you been fooled by a fake news site recently? Can you tell which one of these webpages is from a fake news site, and which one is from a real news site?

American Politic News

americanpolitic
americanpolitic


The Hill

the-hill
the-hill


The Hill is the real news site. American Politic News is the fake news site! Politifact describes it as "a largely sensational website that post stories with shocking headlines that don't always add up."

The traditional name for fake news is propaganda. Dictionary.com defines propaganda as "information, ideas, or rumors deliberately spread widely to help or harm a person, group, movement, institution, nation, etc." and "the deliberate spreading of such information, rumors, etc.," and "the particular doctrines or principles propagated by an organization or movement."

Satire: Fake New's Funny Cousin

Satire news sites are also something that one has to watch out for. Satire is "a way of using humor to show that someone or something is foolish, weak, bad, etc. : humor that shows the weaknesses or bad qualities of a person, government, society, etc," according to Merriam-Webster.

This is an example of satire from The Onion, one of the most well-known satire sites.





Satire is not meant to mislead like fake news is, but it can sometimes be confusing!

Real or Satire is a website where a URL can be put into a search engine that will tell you if the website you are looking at is satire or not, from the database of satire websites they've compiled.

Detecting Fake News

A Google Doc of "False, Misleading, Clickbait-y, and/or Satirical 'News' Sources" was compiled by Melissa Zimdars, an assistant professor of communication at Merrimack College in Massachusetts. However, the LA Times reported that Zimdars took the list down as a "safety measure in response to threats and harassment," but plans on eventually releasing the list in another format.

However, some websites took issue with Zimdars's original list before it was taken down, because she included aggregate sites. Kira Davis, a reporter for RedState, (one of the listed aggregators), said that "RedState writers go to great lengths to debunk false stories they find in the media," and it is in no way a fake or misleading news site.

Davis isn't the only one with a problem with the list. She cites Mediate's Alex Griswold's tweet, illustrating the dilemma and confusion about what should be considered real or fake.

?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Beyond the controversial attempt at a list of sites, there is still a document Zimdar created with some solid tips on how to analyze news sources.

Some of Zimdars tips include:

  • Watching if reputable news sources are reporting on the same story.

  • Check the "About Us" tab on their website, or use Snopes or Wikipedia to find background information on the source.

  • "Odd domain names generally equal odd and rarely truthful news."

  • Bad web design or all caps writing means you should verify what you're reading.

  • If the story makes you really angry, Zimdar says, "It’s probably a good idea to keep reading about the topic via other sources to make sure the story you read wasn’t purposefully trying to make you angry."


Media Platforms Fight Back Against Fake News

Politico reported that both Google and Facebook are going to ban fake news sites from using their advertising platforms.

This news comes after Google and Facebook were criticized for distributing fake news during the 2016 election that critics say impacted the outcome.
In 2016, Oxford Dictionary named the word of the year: "post-truth."

Do you know what is real and what is fake news? Comment here and share your thoughts on our Facebook page, thanks!

This story was originally published on November 25, 2016.

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Howard University is cutting ties to Sean "Diddy" Combs, rescinding an honorary degree that was awarded to him and disbanding a scholarship program in his name, after a recently released 2016 video that appeared to show him attacking the R&B singer Cassie.

"Mr. Combs' behavior as captured in a recently released video is so fundamentally incompatible with Howard University's core values and beliefs that he is deemed no longer worthy to hold the institution's highest honor," a statement from the university's Board of Trustees said.

The statement said the board voted unanimously Friday to accept the return of the honorary degree Combs received in 2014. "This acceptance revokes all honors and privileges associated with the degree. Accordingly, the Board has directed that his name be removed from all documents listing honorary degree recipients of Howard University," it said.

The board also directed university administrators to cut financial ties to Combs, including returning a $1 million contribution, ending the scholarship program and dissolving a 2023 pledge agreement with the Sean Combs Foundation.

An email seeking comment was sent to a Combs spokesperson by The Associated Press on Saturday.

Combs admitted last month that he beat his ex-girlfriend Cassie in a hotel hallway in 2016 after CNN released video of the attack. In a video statement posted on social media, he said he was "truly sorry," and his actions were "inexcusable."

"I take full responsibility for my actions in that video. I was disgusted then when I did it. I'm disgusted now," Combs said.

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