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Iran's Supreme Leader: Attacks Will Increase Hatred of US, Saudis

  • VOA News

Iranians attend the funeral of victims of Islamic State militant attacks, in Tehran, Iran, June 9, 2017. Twin attacks this week killed 17 people.

Iran's leadership on Friday accused the United States and Saudi Arabia of supporting the attacks on Tehran that killed 17 people this week.

As thousands of Iranians attended a funeral for the victims, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said Wednesday's attacks would only increase hate for the U.S. and Saudi governments, according to state media.

The ayatollah made the statement in remarks of condolence for the victims. He said the twin attacks on parliament and the tomb of former leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini "will not damage the Iranian nation's determination."

Extremist group Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attacks.

Iranians in Tehran attend the funeral of victims of Islamic State militant attacks, June 9, 2017. Iranian leaders accused the United States and Saudi Arabia of supporting the IS-claimed dual attacks, which killed 17 people in Tehran this week.
Iranians in Tehran attend the funeral of victims of Islamic State militant attacks, June 9, 2017. Iranian leaders accused the United States and Saudi Arabia of supporting the IS-claimed dual attacks, which killed 17 people in Tehran this week.

Yet, at the funeral following Friday prayers, mourners chanted, "Down with the U.S.," and they called for death for members of the Saudi royal family.

Also Friday, Iranian officials continued a crackdown that followed the attacks. Officials said they had detained 41 suspects in the capital and the country's western Kurdish provinces in raids on suspected safe houses.

Iran's Intelligence Ministry said Thursday that five of the men involved in the attacks were Iranians who had joined IS. The ministry said the men had fought for IS in Mosul, Iraq, and Raqqa, Syria, before returning to Iran last August.

Iranian security officials late Wednesday confirmed IS involvement, saying the attackers, many disguised as women, were Iranians who had joined the terror group.

U.S. intelligence called the incident the worst domestic terror attack in Tehran since the 1980s, but an official said there had been signs IS was at least hoping to strike.

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