Accessibility links

Breaking News

Student Union

Saudi Student From U of Wisconsin Killed

© Courtesy Tommy Hutson
© Courtesy Tommy Hutson
An international student from Saudi Arabia studying at the University of Wisconsin-Stout died after being attacked in downtown Menomonie, Wisconsin, according to police.

Hussain Saeed Alnahdi, 24, was assaulted early Sunday morning outside Topper's Pizza by a suspect described as a 6-foot-tall white male, the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reports.

Alnahdi was found unconscious and bleeding from his mouth and nose by police shortly after the incident.

He was transported to Mayo Health System in Menomonie, then taken to Mayo Health System in Eau Claire, where he died from his injuries on Monday, police said.

Alnahdi was from Buraydah, Saudi Arabia, and came to the U.S. to study business administration at UW-Stout in 2015, according to the university.


In a statement, UW-Stout Chancellor Bob Meyer said, "Our deepest sympathies, thoughts and prayers go out to Hussain’s family in Buraydah, Saudi Arabia, and his friends at UW-Stout."

Meyer also called for action to anyone on campus or in the community who has information about the incident to contact the authorities.

Many classmates and faculty members showed their outrage and condolences on Twitter.





Some students are even troubled by the fact that this incident has not been deemed a hate crime yet.







"I just want our Saudi students to know that they are wanted, they are a deeply important part of this community, they've valued, and we'll do everything we can to keep them safe," said Emi Etuemke, an assistant professor at UW-Stout, to WEAU-TV.

Police said Monday that the motive for the attack is unclear, but they are treating it as a homicide and will continue to monitor surveillance camera's from other businesses in the area.

Erik Atkinson, the town's chief of police, told NBC that authorities will "not dismiss that this could be a hate crime."

In an effort to find the assailant, the city of Menomonie and University of Wisconsin-Stout established a reward for $15,000 for any information leading to the arrest of Alnahdi's attacker. According to the UW-Stout website, the reward is administered through the Community Foundation of Dunn County and will be funded privately through donations. No tax dollars will be involved.

The Council on American Islamic Relations also put a $5,000 reward for more information to bring Alnahdi's assailant to justice.

Chancellor Meyer organized a memorial service for friends and classmates to reflect and remember Hussain Alnahdi .

We're eager to see your comments and thoughts, so please continue this conversation in the comments below this story. And post your comments and questions on our Facebook page, thanks.

See all News Updates of the Day

Campus protests cause some students to rethink US colleges

FILE - Students continue to maintain a protest encampment in support of Palestinians on the Columbia University campus April 24, 2024, during the ongoing conflict between Israel and the Palestinian Islamist group Hamas, in New York City.
FILE - Students continue to maintain a protest encampment in support of Palestinians on the Columbia University campus April 24, 2024, during the ongoing conflict between Israel and the Palestinian Islamist group Hamas, in New York City.

Campus protests at U.S. colleges, and the accompanying unrest and violence, are causing some international students to rethink their plans to study in the United States.

Writing in the Straits Times, Vihanya Rakshika reports that safety concerns are motivating parents to look elsewhere for their children’s higher education. (June 2024)

Which schools have biggest alumni networks?

FILE - In this March 14, 2019, photo, students walk on the Stanford University campus in Santa Clara, Calif.
FILE - In this March 14, 2019, photo, students walk on the Stanford University campus in Santa Clara, Calif.

In addition to considering the cost and reputation of a school, prospective students should consider alumni networks – connected graduates who can help with the job search once classes are complete.

Writing in University Magazine, Anwar Abdi takes a look at the 25 U.S. universities with the largest alumni networks. (June 2024)

Report: Number of college dropouts remains high

FILE - The name for the University of Southern California is displayed at a campus entrance in Los Angeles, April 16, 2024.
FILE - The name for the University of Southern California is displayed at a campus entrance in Los Angeles, April 16, 2024.

Enrollment in U.S. colleges and universities is increasing, but the number of dropouts remains high, according to a report in the Chronicle of High Education.

Amanda Friedman writes that more former students are returning to school, but many want shorter-term programs, such as certificate programs. (June 2024)

Xi wants more exchanges between US, Chinese universities

FILE - Chinese President Xi Jinping talks to U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken (not seen) at the Great Hall of the People, on April 26, 2024, in Beijing, China.
FILE - Chinese President Xi Jinping talks to U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken (not seen) at the Great Hall of the People, on April 26, 2024, in Beijing, China.

Mutual understanding between China and the United States can be improved by having more university exchanges between the two countries.

According to Bloomberg, Chinese President Xi Jinpin told Xinhua News Agency that exchanges could develop young ambassadors who understand both countries. (June 2024)

Students learn protests can affect job prospects

FILE - Students protesting against the war in Gaza, and passersby walking through Harvard Yard, are seen at an encampment at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., on April 25, 2024.
FILE - Students protesting against the war in Gaza, and passersby walking through Harvard Yard, are seen at an encampment at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., on April 25, 2024.

Some students in the U.S. are learning their public stances on the Israel-Hamas war are having an impact on job prospects.

Financial Times reports that protest activities are turning up in background checks, and employers have revoked employment offers to students as a result. (June 2024)

Load more

XS
SM
MD
LG