People leave a shopping mall following an earthquake in Jakarta, Indonesia, Aug. 2, 2019. A strong earthquake struck off the coast of Indonesia's Java island  swaying buildings as far away as the capital.
People leave a shopping mall following an earthquake in Jakarta, Indonesia, Aug. 2, 2019. A strong earthquake struck off the coast of Indonesia's Java island swaying buildings as far away as the capital.

Updated Aug. 3, 2:25 a.m.

JAKARTA, INDONESIA — Indonesian authorities say one person has died of a heart attack and more than 100 houses are damaged after a 6.8 magnitude earthquake hit off Java island, swaying buildings as far away as the capital.

The U.S. Geological Survey says Friday night's quake was centered 151 kilometers (94 miles) from Banten province off the island's southwest coast.

The National Disaster Mitigation Agency said Saturday that a woman died of a heart attack while fleeing to safety in Pecangsari, the village closest to the epicenter. Four people have been injured.

The agency says at least 113 houses and buildings were damaged and about 1,050 people fled to temporary shelters. TV footage showed several houses and buildings in Banten and West Java provinces, including a sport stadium and hospitals, suffered minor damage.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center did not issue a tsunami warning, watch or advisory after the quake. Indonesian authorities, however, issued their own before lifting it two hours later when no wave materialized.

Authorities had called on people living in coastal areas to move to higher ground but not to panic.

Buildings in Jakarta swayed for nearly a minute during the evening quake. Television footage showed workers and residents running out of high-rise buildings.

Radio and television reports said people felt a strong quake in Banten province and in Lampung province along the southern part of Sumatra island. The temblor caused a panic among residents in several cities and villages.

Houses collapse

The quake brought back bad memories in Banten's Pandeglang region, which encompasses Unjung Kulon National Park and popular beaches, and is where a deadly tsunami struck in the dark without warning last December.

That tsunami followed an eruption and a possible landslide on Anaka Krakatau, one of the world's most famous volcanic islands, about 112 kilometers (69.5 miles) southwest of Jakarta. The waves killed at least 222 people as they smashed into houses, hotels and other beachside buildings along the Sunda Strait.

Irna Narulita, the Pandeglang district chief, said at least 22 houses collapsed in the region after Friday's quake, and most people remained outside because of fear of aftershocks.  She said villagers in Sumur, the village hardest hit by the tsunami in December, chose to stay on a hill even after the tsunami alert was lifted.

Stadium, hospitals damaged

The National Disaster Agency spokesman, Agus Wibowo, said they were still gathering information of the damage and injuries. Local television footage and online video showed several houses and buildings in Banten, including a sport stadium and hospitals, suffered minor damage.

After the quake hospitals in West Java's cities of Bogor, Ciamis and Cianjur evacuated patients, some attached to intravenous drips, to the hospital grounds, television footage showed.