FILE - Miniature national flags representing Mexico and the United States stand side by side during trade discussions in Mexico City, July 29, 2014.
FILE - Miniature national flags representing Mexico and the United States stand side by side during trade discussions in Mexico City, July 29, 2014.

The United States and Mexico plan to hold talks within 90 days to discuss U.S. concerns that imports of Mexican fruits and vegetables could be harming U.S. farmers. 

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer’s office announced Tuesday the United States wants to specifically look at imports of strawberries, bell peppers and other seasonal perishable goods, and that the review could lead to the imposition of tariffs. 

“President Trump recognizes the challenges faced by American farmers and is committed to promoting and securing fair trade and a level playing field for all American producers,” Lighthizer said in a statement. 

Mexico’s economy ministry committed to participating in the talks and, in a statement, said it wants to "find mutually satisfactory solutions to the concerns raised by the agricultural industry of both countries.” 

Mexico also said it would seek to "defend the preferential access of Mexican agricultural exports to the United States." 

The two countries, along with Canada, began a new trade deal called the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement two months ago, replacing the North American Free Trade Agreement that had governed trade in the region for 26 years.