There are concerns that inadequate schooling and vocational training opportunities for Rohingya youth could leave young refugees unprepared for life as adults. (Dave Grunebaum/VOA)
There are concerns that inadequate schooling and vocational training opportunities for Rohingya youth could leave young refugees unprepared for life as adults. (Dave Grunebaum/VOA)

Editor's note: We want you to know what's happening, and why and how it could impact your life, family or business, so we created a weekly digest of the top original immigration, migration and refugee reporting from across VOA. Questions? Tips? Comments? Email the VOA immigration team: ImmigrationUnit@voanews.com.

U.S.: Refugee rules
A recent presidential order requires U.S. states to decide — and publicly state — whether they will accept refugees. Several governors have officially pledged to participate in what, until this year, was a program that placed refugees in every U.S. state and territory.

Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly speaks with reporters following a meeting with top legislative leaders, Wednesday, June 5, 2019, at the…
More US States Welcome Refugees Under New Trump Rule
A bipartisan group of governors and city leaders are opting into the program

Bangladesh: Struggling for education
A human rights watchdog group says Bangladesh is threatening the futures of Rohingya refugee children by blocking them from access to proper schooling. With little indication that the refugees will be able to repatriate any time soon, aid workers say changes have to be made to how the youngest among the displaced are being treated.

Rohingya refugee children attend a class to learn Burmese language at a refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, April 9, 2019.
Rights Group: Bangladesh Blocking Rohingya Refugee Education
Human Rights Watch says government's curbs on schooling may help drive refugees into the arms of gangs, traffickers and radicals

Lebanon: Limits on the future
When the options for your future are between a bombed out home, or harassment and poverty in the place you sought refuge, the future can seem bleak. Syrians living in Lebanon talk with VOA about what choices they are contemplating, as their lives stall out in exile.

Yousra, a Syrian refugee from Damascus, says despite increasing harassment, she believes Lebanese people should continue to demonstrate for basic rights, , in the Bekkaa Valley, Lebanon, Nov. 30, 2019. (Heather Murdock/VOA)
Facing Harassment in Lebanon, Syrian Refugees Ponder Dismal Options
As protests continue in Lebanon, Syrian refugees say they face increased harassment and fear violent outbreaks

From the Feds
-U.S. immigration agents detained in recent years an increasing number of transgender and pregnant individuals, as well as people with disabilities, according to a new report published by the agency's inspector general this week. 
-The number of human smuggling and trafficking arrests also rose in the last year, the immigration enforcement agency announced.